Research in sport and recreation

Ranked in the top 27 in the world, AUT is globally known for its leading sport and exercise science research. Our research covers sport and activity-related areas, as well as performance, nutrition, coaching and human potential.

We're proud to be the home of New Zealand's top sport and fitness facility, AUT Millennium, and the Sports Performance Research Institute New Zealand (SPRINZ) is New Zealand’s number one sports research institute.

AUT Millennium

Our researchers work on key national projects at AUT Millennium, our world-class sports training and research facility in Mairangi Bay.

AUT Millennium website

Explore our research expertise

AUT's academic supervisors are recognised world-class researchers who have the expert knowledge in their fields to guide you throughout your studies.

If you’re interested in applying to a doctoral degree or a Master of Philosophy, email doctoral.and.mphil.admissions@aut.ac.nz first to assess your eligibility for the programme.

Browse research expertise

John Cronin
Erica Hinckson
Grant Schofield
News
HRC 2021
Heat chamber
Professor Jarrod Haar, Professor Patria Hume, Professor Denise Wilson
Girls playing netball
Associate Professor Andrew Gibbons standing in a classroom.
News pattern
HRC 2021
HRC Emerging Researchers First Grants
28 May, 2021
AUT picked up one third of Health Research Council Emerging Researchers First Grants this year.
Heat chamber
Feeling the Tokyo Heat
15 Apr, 2021
Top Kiwi athletes training for the Olympics under AUT’s Professor Andrew Kilding and other sport scientists.
Professor Jarrod Haar, Professor Patria Hume, Professor Denise Wilson
New Royal Society Te Apārangi Fellows
16 Mar, 2021
Three AUT academics have been elected as Fellows to the Academy of the Royal Society Te Apārangi.
Girls playing netball
Sport clubs face COVID financial pain
09 Oct, 2020
Sports clubs connected to NZ’s most traditional codes report being “hit hard” by the impact of COVID-19 according to the 2020 National Sport Club Survey.
Associate Professor Andrew Gibbons standing in a classroom.
ECE positive for social outcomes
23 Sep, 2020
New research has found that children who attend ECE have fewer emotional difficulties and better peer relations, but are more prone to common illnesses.
Erika Ikeda
Chloe McKenzie
Enora Le Flao
Isaac Amoah
Mel Johnston

Website search