Summer School 2018/2019

Summer School is an intensive study method open to everyone – even non-AUT students. Summer study can help you prepare to re-enter the workforce, upskill for a career change, or simply learn something new.

We've got papers in a range of fields, so you’re sure to find something to suit you.

Already an AUT student?

No need to apply. You can find available paper options in Blackboard and enrol via Arion.

Study areas

Browse Summer School papers by study area below – you can take up to two papers.

Understanding Children

Paper code: EDUC505
Location: North Campus
Dates: Thur 7th , Fri 8th, Thur 21st & Fri 22nd February 2019
Times: 9-4pm
Lecturer: Chris Jenkin
Fees: $854.63
Apply by: 8/2/2019

Overview
This paper provides an overview of understanding children (0-12 years) in the context of family, whānau and society in Aotearoa New Zealand and globally. The focus is on a holistic view of young children, using inquiry, based on a range of theoretical perspectives and cultural frameworks of young children’s development and learning. You'll be given opportunities to research topics that are of particular interest to you and are encouraged to relate your research to a child’s rights approach to services for children, which encourages greater participation of young children in decision-making. In the paper, you'll engage in contemporary research and study on child development including the role of play in learning; theoretical frameworks for understanding children as holistic learners; historical perspectives of childhood and the social construction of childhood.

This paper covers the following topics:

  • Children and IT
  • Gender identity
  • Children’s rights and citizenship
  • Children’s right to play
  • Child health and well-being
  • Participation of children with special needs
Assessments encourage wide engagement with contemporary research and relevant policy documents with a specific focus on the New Zealand Children’s Commissioner document ‘Being child- centred’ (2015). Ref: Office of the Children’s Commissioner. (October, 2015). Being child-centred. This paper could count towards a Bachelor of Arts in Education or a Bachelor of Arts in Children and Learning for 2019.

Apply now

Current AUT studentNew to AUT

  1. Investigate theories of young children’s development in relation to physical growth, cognitive and social-emotional well-being, communication, and spirituality
  2. Reflect on the significance of cultural influences on young children’s development and learning in the context of Aotearoa New Zealand
  3. Examine holistic development in children 0-8 years old and the implications for informing policy in Aotearoa New Zealand


Education, Careers and Employability

Paper code: EDUC506
Location: City Campus
Dates: 11, 12, 18, 19, 20 February 2019
Times: 9-12pm and 1-3pm
Lecturer: Lynette Reid
Fees: $854.63
Apply by: 8/2/2019

Overview
This paper will introduce you to the concept of ‘career’ in an education context. You'll explore current career theories and the relevance of these to education and your own emerging career identities. We examine the development of personal career identity and the interplay between contextual experiences and the meaning of work. Attention will be on designing a person’s learning, employment and career using storytelling to reveal the multidimensional influences in a person’s life. This process will take place within the premise of where work fits in a person’s life and ways to enhance their place in the changing world of work. Also underpinning this paper are approaches to learning in higher education. Concepts such as life-long learning and life-wide learning will be integrated into personal stories. This paper could count towards a Bachelor of Arts in Education for 2019.

Apply now

Current AUT studentNew to AUT

The outcome of this paper is a meaningful exploration of personal experiences and stories in support of current and future career, employment and learning aspirations and goals. This will take place in a learning environment developed on respect, curiosity and interactive conversations with individuals interacting with and within social, environmental and personal contexts.


Introduction to Narrative Therapy

Paper code: PSYT713
Location: South Campus
Dates: 14-18 Jan 2019
Times: 9am - 5pm
Fees: TBC
Apply by: Applications will close when paper is full.

Overview
This paper provides an introduction to Narrative Therapy and the ideas underpinning practice. It discusses theories and philosophies such as social constructionism and postmodernism. Email Brian Rodgers for more details.

Current AUT studentNew to AUT

  1. Identify the ideas central to narrative therapy
  2. Understand key skills used in narrative therapy
  3. Demonstrate ability to intervene therapeutically using narrative ideas
  4. Critically analyse the implications for using the narrative metaphor in counselling
  5. Present work at the appropriate academic standard


Spanish 1A

Paper code: SPAN501
Location: City Campus
Dates: 14 Jan – 22 Feb 2019 (Tuesdays and Thursdays)
Times: 10-12pm & 12-1pm
Lecturer: Gloria Vazquez
Fees: $854.63
Apply by: Until full

Overview
Did you know Spanish is the third most spoken language in the world? Learning this language will enhance your travel experiences, career prospects and broaden your mind. Add something extra to your CV that will open doors to future international employment by taking this paper.

Current AUT studentNew to AUT

You'll develop your competency in both written and oral Spanish to communicate at a simple and elementary level. Emphasis is on linguistic competence in the following components: Listening, speaking, reading and writing. This paper also aims to provide you with basic communicative competence in the Spanish language as a whole, in daily situations within cultural and social contexts.


Korean Language and Culture 1

Paper code: KORE500
Location: City Campus
Dates: 14 Jan – 22 Feb 2019 (Tuesdays and Thursdays) or (Wednesdays and Fridays)
Times: 1-4pm
Lecturer: Bliss Lee
Fees: $854.63
Apply by: Until full

Overview
Korean Language and Culture 1 is for students who have a little or no knowledge of the language and culture, and who are interested in being able to communicate and interact with Korean speakers. Students will be able to communicate in Korean at a simple practical level in order to socialise and carry out activities in a range of contexts, using culturally appropriate language and gestures. Traditional and contemporary Korean culture and social practices including generational change, K-pop and the ‘Korean Wave’, will be explored. Values and beliefs will be compared to provide insights into students’ own cultures as well as the cultures of others.

Current AUT studentNew to AUT

By learning the language and culture of this fascinating country, you'll gain an insight and understanding of the people and the place. You'll speak Korean from day one and by the end of this enjoyable and interactive course, you'll be able to communicate in everyday situations and acquire basic listening, reading and writing skills.


NZ Sign Language and Deaf Culture 1A

Paper code: NZSL511
Location: City Campus
Dates: 15 Jan – 8 Feb 2019 (Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays)
Times: 9am-12pm
Lecturer: Susie Ovens
Fees: $854.63
Apply by: Until full

Overview
This beginner-level paper will introduce you to the world of New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL) and Deaf culture. This paper is taught by deaf lecturer Susie Ovens, and from day one you'll learn through immersion to turn your voices off at the door. NZSL is fun and interactive; through language activities and lots of practice in class, you'll learn to have basic conversations in NZSL.

Current AUT studentNew to AUT

You'll learn to communicate with your hands and your eyes. You will learn that the structure of NZSL is very different to English, and that the language incorporates many Māori concepts. You will also learn about Deaf culture. By the end of this paper, you will be able to hold a basic conversation in NZSL - a valuable addition to any CV.


Te Tiriti O Waitangi: The Treaty of Waitangi

Paper code: HIST690
Location: online
Dates: 7 Jan – 8 Feb 2019
Times: n/a (online paper)
Fees: $765
Apply by: 7/1/2019

Overview
This paper is designed for anyone with an interest in the Treaty of Waitangi and related issues. It aims to give you a broad understanding of the main issues associated with the Treaty, regardless of your background or prior knowledge of this area. Online delivery gives you maximum flexibility, as well as enhanced one-on-one contact with Professor Paul Moon. This paper could count towards a Bachelor of Arts or a Bachelor of Māori Development in Māori Media for 2019.

Current AUT studentNew to AUT

You'll learn about the texts of the Treaty and their various meanings. Differences between the Māori and English versions of the document will be considered, with a focus on some of the key words in both versions. You'll also learn about the the history and workings of the Waitangi Tribunal, and how the Treaty features in Government policy. There is a particular emphasis on evaluating the extent to which the Tribunal has satisfied Māori grievances arising from breaches of the Treaty by the Crown.

Finally, you'll get the opportunity to apply the principles of the Treaty specifically to your work environment.

  • Discuss and evaluate some of the aspects of the meaning of the Treaty of Waitangi, focusing on the terms used, and the differences in interpretation that exist
  • Outline of some of the British intentions for the Treaty
  • Discuss differences between the Maori and English versions of the Treaty
  • Construct an overview of Maori understandings of the Treaty in 1840
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the Waitangi Tribunal in satisfying Maori grievances arising from Crown breaches of the Treaty
  • Assess the effectiveness of the Fiscal Envelope as a means of effectively resolving Treaty claims
  • Determine the significance of the inclusion of Treaty principles in a piece of legislation
  • Discuss the principles of the Treaty and their application in organisations
  • Examine the relationship between the Treaty and equity issues


Our People, Our Stories: Contemporary New Zealand Oral Histories

Paper code: HIST692
Location: online
Dates: 7 Jan – 8 Feb 2019
Times: n/a (online paper)
Fees: $765
Apply by: 7/1/2019

Overview
This paper offers an introduction to the acquisition, curation, and publication of oral histories using digital-based platforms. The standard disciplines associated with collecting, evaluating, contextualising and editing oral histories will be applied and the material published in a digital form.

Current AUT studentNew to AUT

  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of the ethical issues associated with gathering oral histories
  • Establish parameters and terms of reference for conducting interviews
  • Decide on the appropriate electronic media to be used to record the interviews
  • Apply necessary ethical procedures and secure required consents
  • Collect an oral history, produce a presentation of the material using a digital story-telling platform, combining podcasts, written material, sound recordings, and images
  • Apply appropriate referencing methods
  • Present the finished project


Nostalgia and Utopianism in New Zealand History

Paper code: HIST701
Location: online
Dates: 7 Jan – 8 Feb 2019
Times: n/a (online paper)
Fees: $765
Apply by: 7/1/2019

Overview
This paper aims to introduce you to theories of nostalgia and utopianism, and to enable you to examine how aspects of these concepts can be applied to various episodes in New Zealand history since the 1830s. You'll be able to select your own topics of exploration (with guidance), and will explore how theories of nostalgia and utopianism apply to actual historical examples.

Current AUT studentNew to AUT

  • Identify the key theorists and tenets of nostalgia and utopianism
  • Produce a literature review which explores and critiques aspects of these theories
  • Evaluate Popper’s arguments against utopianism
  • Formulate a knowledge of utopian movements in New Zealand history
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the role of nostalgia in perceptions of history
  • Analyse the social and political implications of nostalgia
  • Locate, summarise, and apply theories of utopianism and nostalgia to case studies


Teaching methods

Summer School papers are adapted to a shorter time frame, but the subject content, learning outcomes and assessments are identical to our regular semester courses. This also means you're expected to study or complete activities outside of class time.

Fees-free study

If you’re a domestic student, you may be eligible to study fees-free at AUT Summer School. There are specific eligibility requirements, so ensure you check these before you apply.

More information about fees-free study

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Course costs

Course costs are listed under each paper. These are for domestic students only and are subject to change.

For more information about fees, contact us.