Master of English and New Media Studies

Interested in the connection between technology and communication? Study the Master of English and New Media Studies.

In the Master of English and New Media Studies you explore the increasingly important nexus between new media and spoken, written or visual communication in English. The programme culminates in a one or two-semester research project of an experimental, theoretical, creative or practice-based nature.

Your research project could involve the development of game or transmedia narratives. It could investigate social media or other forms of web communication - including internet memes and fake news - for issues of power and identity, or to identify emerging language trends. It might also examine the use and impact of virtual or augmented reality for language learning and teaching.

Start date: 2021

Minimum entry requirements

One of the following or equivalent with a B grade average or higher in papers at level 7 or above:

  • Relevant bachelor’s degree OR
  • Relevant graduate diploma

International student entry requirements

English language requirements

  • IELTS (Academic) 6.5 overall with all bands 6.0 or higher; or equivalent

English language requirements

You need to complete 60 points of papers if you want to do the 120 point thesis. You need to complete 120 points of papers if you want to do the 60-point dissertation. The core paper English and New Media Research Methods is compulsory.

Areas covered include:

  • Game narrative and interactive storytelling
  • Multiplatform transmedia narratives
  • Web communication
  • Corpus, multimodal and critical discourse analysis of new and social media
  • Text mining and analytics
  • Virtual reality, new media and language education
  • Internet phenomena, e.g. memes, netspeak, fake news
  • Social media and (virtual) identity
  • Intercultural communication and new media
  • Social media, communication and creativity

Core paper

Elective papers

Thesis or dissertation

Your chosen papers need to be approved by the programme leader.

The research thesis is at the heart of this programme.

You could investigate the potential of online virtual worlds or explore complex issues of virtual identity, with many applications, including those for language or literacy learning and teaching. Those interested in translation and interpreting might research the effectiveness of online machine translation tools. More creative-based projects could explore the performative potential of multiplatform transmedia narratives, geo-located augmented reality (AR) sites, games and storyworlds.

Read more about some of the projects our students have worked on.

Photo of Isaac Waetford

Interpreting and animating the Tāwhaki myth cycle in a video game

Isaac Waetford

Isaac explored the ways in which video games can be used to preserve and revitalise obscure Māori oral traditions, like the Tāwhaki myth cycle. A range of narratological and ludological approaches were considered, with the eventual creation of a prototype based on the adventure game genre.

Photo of Sarah Batkin

An everyday feminist: A corpus-based critical discourse analysis of digital feminist news media

Sarah Batkin

Sarah employed corpus linguistics and critical discourse analysis to analyse popular digital feminist news sites like Jezebel, Bust, and Broadly. The goal of her research was to use these websites as a lens to observe emergent ideological shifts within the feminist movement.

Photo of Nick Jones

Story meets story world: How do you construct a non-linear, narrative-rich virtual reality experience while working within the confines of a traditional MMORPG?

Nick Jones

Nick's thesis involved the development of the story, history, dialogue, and other in-game writing for the virtual reality game OrbusVR. In doing so Nick was looking to establish a new language for the MMORPG narrative; one that matches the dynamic, non-linear and interactive nature of the medium.

Photo of Caitlin van Hoffen

A corpus-assisted critical discourse analysis of crowd-sourced constructions of political identity

Caitlin van Hoffen

Caitlin is using the text analysis software Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) to examine how people construct their own and opposing political identities in the anonymous and unmoderated online setting of Urban Dictionary.

Photo of Andi Chen

Reflections on the design and development of language educational resources in the three-dimensional virtual reality environment High Fidelity

Andi Chen

Andi’s research involved the design and development of virtual English language educational resources in the totally immersive three-dimensional VR environment of High Fidelity. She also carried out a user evaluation to see how language learners would respond to these resources, and the use of Oculus VR headsets and touch controllers.

Photo of Simona Xie

Language educational space design in High Fidelity

Simona Xie

Simona’s research involved the design and development of a virtual English language educational space in the totally immersive three-dimensional VR environment of High Fidelity. She also carried out a user evaluation to see how language learners would engage with the space and the use of Oculus VR headsets and touch controllers. This was a collaborative work with Andi Chen.

Photo of Angela Desmarais

The master narratives of online discourse surrounding men who knit

Angela Desmarais

Angela is researching gender stereotyping towards men who knit and how this influences the way they perform their identities, both online and offline. She is analysing data collected from the Reddit sub thread r/knitting and face-to-face interviews with men who knit.

Photo of Marisa Aoys

Intercultural communication through new media: Interactions of cultures through gaming localisation

Marisa Aoys

Marisa is examining game localisation and its effect on intercultural communication in the current technological environment. It will explore the aspect of identity and culture in the gaming industry, as well as the impact this has on individuals and the gaming climate.

Photo of Monique Porteous

Instagram, influencers and multimodal discourses of influencing

Monique Porteous

Monique is carrying out a multimodal analysis of the images posted by Instagram influencers in order to examine whether there is a statistical correlation between the number of likes a post receives, and the semiotic choices (eg gaze, image act, social distance, size of frame, angle, semiotic space, colour, visual framing) made to construct the image. The goal is to investigate whether certain semiotic choices motivate Instagrammers to follow a particular post.

  • New and social media research
  • Language and literacy education
  • Online journalism
  • Public relations
  • New and social media practice
  • Translation and interpreting
  • Advertising
  • The arts and cultural industries
  • Travel and tourism
  • Content development for virtual and augmented realities

You will also be prepared for doctoral study.

Quick facts
Programme code:
AK1048
Level:
9
Points:
180
Duration:
1.5 years full-time / part-time available
Campus:
City Campus
Starts:
22 Feb 2021
12 Jul 2021
July intake only open for domestic students.
Fees:
Domestic
$8,711
  • This represents the approximate tuition fee based on a full-time workload of 120 points of this 180-point programme in 2020. The exact tuition fee will depend on papers selected and may exceed this figure.
  • Fees are subject to change year to year. If you are planning for beyond 2020, fees may vary from those stated.
  • There may also be other fees and charges you need to pay. Learn more about fees to study at AUT
International
$33,058
  • This represents the approximate tuition fee based on a full-time workload of 120 points of this 180-point programme in 2020. The exact tuition fee will depend on papers selected and may exceed this figure.
  • Fees are subject to change year to year. If you are planning for beyond 2020, the tuition fee may vary from the figure stated.
  • There may also be other fees and charges you need to pay. Learn more about fees to study at AUT
  • International students' tuition fees reflect the full cost of tuition. Domestic students' tuition fees are less due to a proportion of the tuition fees being funded by the New Zealand Government.

Scholarships at AUT

The information on this page was correct at time of publication. For a comprehensive overview of AUT qualifications, please refer to the Academic Calendar.

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