Dr Nada Signal

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Senior Lecturer

Email: nada.signal@aut.ac.nz

ORCID: ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9595-0532

Qualifications:

  • PhD, Auckand University of Technology
  • MHSc (Rehabilitation), Auckand University of Technology
  • BHSc (Physiotherapy), Auckland University of Technology

Overview:

Dr Nada Signal is a Senior Lecturer in Physiotherapy at Auckland University of Technology’s School of Clinical Sciences and Co-Director of the Rehabilitation Innovation Centre. In 2007 she completed her Masters of Health Science investigating neuromuscular fatigue in people with stroke, and in 2014 her Doctorate of Philosophy investigating the effects of different forms of exercise rehabilitation in people with stroke. She has 20 years’ physiotherapy clinical and leadership experience in community, rehabilitation and acute healthcare settings; primarily working with people with neurological conditions. Nada is a Principal Investigator with the Medical Technologies Center for Research Excellence and recipient of a New Zealand Health Research Council Emerging Researcher Award. Her research focuses on innovation in rehabilitation clinical practice and the development of novel technologies to augment rehabilitation. Nada teaches on the physiotherapy undergraduate programme and the rehabilitation post-graduate programmes. She currently supervises seven post-graduate students at Masters and Doctorate level from clinical, design and engineering backgrounds.

Research interests:

Stroke Rehabilitation
Neurological Rehabilitation
Rehabilitation Technology
• Rehabilitation Robotics
• Brain Computer Interfaces
• Wearable devices
Exercise Rehabilitation
Neuromodulation
Motor Control and Motor Learning

Fields of research:

  • Medical Devices
  • Physiotherapy
  • Rehabilitation and Therapy (Excl. Physiotherapy)
  • Motor Control
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases

Research outputs:

Journal articles

  • Rashid, U., Niazi, I. K., Signal, N., Farina, D., & Taylor, D. (2019). Optimal automatic detection of muscle activation intervals. Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, 48, 103-111. doi:10.1016/j.jelekin.2019.06.010

  • Jochumsen, M., Navid, M. S., Nedergaard, R. W., Signal, N., Rashid, U., Hassan, A., . . . Niazi, I. K. (2019). Self-paced online vs. cue-based offline brain-computer interfaces for inducing neural plasticity. Brain Sciences, 9(6). doi:10.3390/brainsci9060127

  • Rashid, U., Kumari, N., Taylor, D., David, T., & Signal, N. (2019). Gait event anomaly detection and correction during a split-belt treadmill task. IEEE Access, 7, 68469-68478. doi:10.1109/ACCESS.2019.2918559

  • Rashid, U., Niazi, I. K., Jochumsen, M., Krol, L. R., Signal, N., & Taylor, D. (2019). Automated labeling of movement- related cortical potentials using segmented regression. IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, 27(6), 1282-1291. doi:10.1109/TNSRE.2019.2913880

  • McLaren, R., Signal, N., Lord, S., Taylor, S., Henderson, J., & Taylor, D. (2019). The volume and timing of upper limb movement in acute stroke rehabilitation: Still room for improvement. Disability and Rehabilitation. doi:10.1080/09638288.2019.1590471

  • Lemke, M., Rodríguez Ramírez, E., Robinson, B., & Signal, N. (2019). Motivators and barriers to using information and communication technology in everyday life following stroke: A qualitative and video observation study. Disability and Rehabilitation. doi:10.1080/09638288.2018.1543460

  • Rashid, U., Niazi, I. K., Signal, N., & Taylor, D. (2018). An EEG experimental study evaluating the performance of Texas instruments ADS1299. Sensors (Switzerland), 18(11). doi:10.3390/s18113721

  • Olsen, S. O., Signal, N., Niazi, I., Christensen, T., Jochumsen, M., & Taylor, D. T. (2018). Paired associative stimulation delivered by pairing movement-related cortical potentials with peripheral electrical stimulation: An investigation of the duration of neuromodulatory effects. Neuromodulation, 21(4), 362-367. doi:10.1111/ner.12616

  • Taylor, D., Binns, E., & Signal, N. (2017). Upping the ante: Working harder to address physical inactivity in older adults. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 30(5). doi:10.1097/YCO.0000000000000349

  • Birch, N., Graham, J., Priestley, T., Heywood, C., Sakel, M., Gall, A., . . . Signal, N. (2017). Results of the first interim analysis of the RAPPER II trial in patients with spinal cord injury: Ambulation and functional exercise programs in the REX powered walking aid.. Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 14.

  • Signal, N., McPherson, K., Lewis, G., Kayes, N., Saywell, N., Mudge, S., & Taylor, D. (2016). What influences acceptability and engagement with a high intensity exercise programme for people with stroke? A qualitative descriptive study. NeuroRehabilitation, 39(4). doi:10.3233/NRE-161382

  • Mudge, S., Rosie, J., Stott, S., Taylor, D., Signal, N., & McPherson, K. (2016). Ageing with cerebral palsy; what are the health experiences of adults with cerebral palsy? A qualitative study.. BMJ Open, 6(10). doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012551

  • Jochumsen, M., Niazi, I. K., Signal, N., Nedergaard, R. W., Holt, K., Haavik, H., & Taylor, D. (2016). Pairing Voluntary Movement and Muscle-Located Electrical Stimulation Increases Cortical Excitability. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 10, 482. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2016.00482

  • Wilson, N. C., Signal, N., Naude, Y., Taylor, D., & Stott, N. S. (2015). Gait deviation index correlates with daily step activity in children with cerebral palsy. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 96(10). doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2015.05.024

  • Jochumsen, M., Signal, N., Nedergaard, R. W., Taylor, D., Haavik, H., & Niazi, I. K. (2015). Induction of long-term depression-like plasticity by pairings of motor imagination and peripheral electrical stimulation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 9. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2015.00644

  • Signal, N. E. J. (2014). Strength training after stroke: Rationale, evidence and potential implementation barriers for physiotherapists. New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy, 42(2).

  • Signal, N., Taylor, D., & McNair, P. J. (2008). Central and peripheral contributions to neuromuscular fatigue in people with stroke. Physical Therapy Reviews, 13(4).

Conference contributions

  • Olsen, S., Signal, N., & Taylor, D. (2019). A novel neuromodulatory intervention to improve neuromuscular control following stroke.. In Brain Research New Zealand Conference. Auckland.

  • Signal, N., Scott, K., Taylor, D., & Kayes, N. (2019). What helps or hinders the uptake of new technologies into rehabilitation practice?. In Converging clinical and engineering research on neurorehabilitation III: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on NeuroRehabilitation (ICNR2018) Vol. 21 (pp. 265-268). Pisa: Springer Nature. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-01845-0

  • Rashid, U., Signal, N., Niazi, I. K., & Taylor, D. (2019). footpress: An open-source MATLAB toolbox for analysis of pedobarography data. In Converging clinical and engineering research on neurorehabilitation III: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on NeuroRehabilitation (ICNR2018) Vol. 21 (pp. 361-364). Pisa. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-01845-0_72

  • Ramírez, E. R., Petrie, R., Chan, K., & Signal, N. (2018). A tangible interface and augmented reality game for facilitating sit-to-stand exercises for stroke rehabilitation. In Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on the Internet of Things. Santa Barbara. doi:10.1145/3277593.3277635

  • Olsen, S., Signal, N., Niazi, I., Alder, G., Jochumsen, M., & Taylor, D. (2017). Measuring changes in neuromuscular control following neuromodulation. A feasibility study in people with stroke.. In 27th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Society of Australasia. Queenstown.

  • Signal, N., Birch, N., Graham, J., Priestly, T., Heywood, C., Sakel, M., . . . Nunn, A. (2017). The feasibility, safety and acceptability of the REX robotic exoskeleton for ambulation and upper body exercise in people with SCI. In Rehab Week 2017- International Neurorehabilitation Symposium. London. Retrieved from http://www.rehabweek.org/2017/Documents/Poster%20schedule%20Final.pdf

  • Signal, N. (2016). The Rehabilitation Innovation Centre: A novel approach to rehabilitation
    technology development. In Phyiotherapy New Zealand Conference: Abstracts. Auckland. Retrieved from https://pnz.org.nz/

  • Signal, N. (2016). Rehabilitation technology: The hype, the reality and the role of
    physiotherapists.. In Physiotherapy New Zealand Conference 2016. Auckland. Retrieved from https://pnz.org.nz/

  • Olsen, S., Signal, N., Niazi, I., Christensen, T., & Taylor, D. (2016). Brain Computer Interface-based Paired Associative Stimulation: An investigation of the duration of neuromodulatory effects.. In Physiotherapy New Zealand Conference 2016. Auckland: Physiotherapy New Zealand. Retrieved from https://pnz.org.nz/

  • Taylor, D., Signal, N., Jochumsen, M., Cremoux, S., & Niazi, I. (2016). A framework for considering the voice of the users of BCI rehabilitation devices. In International Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) Meeting 2016. California. Retrieved from http://bcisociety.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Workshops_5.9.pdf

  • Taylor, D., Chamberlain, J., Signal, N., Scott, N., Kasabov, N., Capecci, E., . . . Hou, Z. G. (2015). Brain-computer interfaces for neuro rehabilitation. In 13th International Conference on Neuro- Computing and Evolving Intelligence (NCEI) 2015. New Zealand: Knowledge Engineering and Discovery Research institute.

  • Olsen, S. A., Signal, N., Niazi, I. K., Christensen, T. M., & Taylor, D. (2015). An investigation of the duration of cortical excitability in healthy subjects​. In Australasian Winter Conference on Brain Research 2014. Queenstown.

  • Niazi, I. K., Signal, N., Jochumsen, M., Holt, K., Haavik, H., & Taylor, D. (2015). Investigating the Effect of Electrical Stimulation Modalities Paired with Cortical Potentials Generated by Motor Imagination and Motor Execution. In Australasian Winter Conference on Brain Research 2014. Queenstown.

  • Signal, N., McPherson, K., Lewis, G., & Taylor, D. (2015). Training intensity: A barrier or facilitator to engagement in rehabilitation following stroke?. In World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress 2015. Singapore.

  • Signal, N., Lewis, G. L., Taylor, D., & McPherson, K. M. (2014). Identifying appropriate measures of neural plasticity in response to locomotor rehabilitation in people with stroke. In New Zealand Applied Neurosciences Conference. Auckland.

  • Niazi, I., Taylor, D., Signal, N., Demstrup, K., Jochumsem, M., & Farina, D. (2014). A movement related cortical potential protocol for inducing neural plasticity. In New Zealand Applied Neurosciences Conference. Auckland.

  • Signal, N., & Stavric, V. (2014). When the safe thing to do is taking a risk... High intensity training in the neurological population. In Physiotherapy New Zealand Conference 2014: Linking The Chain. Auckland.

  • Towersey, N. C. M., & Signal, N. (2014). Making sense of it...retraining somatosensation. In Physiotherapy New Zealand Conference 2014: Linking the chain. Auckland.

  • Wilson, N. C., Signal, N., Naude, Y., Taylor, D., & Stott, N. S. (2015). Gait Deviation Index Correlates with Daily Step Activity in Children with Cerebral Palsy. . Retrieved from internal-pdf://0510416233/1-s2.0-S0003999315004839-main.pdf

  • Signal, N., Lewis, G., Taylor, D., & McPherson, K. M. (2013). Are TMS-derived measures reliable markers of neural plasticity in people with stroke?. In Progress in Motor Control IX. Montreal.

Working paper/discussions

  • Taylor, D., Signal, N., Jochumsen, M., & Niazi, I. K. (2015). The Movement Related Cortical Potential: an endogenous signal to drive a Paired Associative Stimulation Protocol. Hindawi. Retrieved from http://www.hindawi.com/