Dr Nada Signal

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Senior Lecturer

Email: nada.signal@aut.ac.nz

ORCID: ORCID logo https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9595-0532

Academic appointments:

  • Associate Head of Research, Auckland University of Technology (2019 - ongoing)
  • Senior Lecturer in Physiotherapy, Auckland University of Technology (2017 - ongoing)

Qualifications:

  • PhD, Auckand University of Technology
  • MHSc (Rehabilitation), Auckand University of Technology
  • BHSc (Physiotherapy), Auckland University of Technology

Overview:

Dr Nada Signal is Associate Head of Research and a Senior Lecturer in Physiotherapy for the School of Clinical Sciences. In 2007 she completed her Masters of Health Science investigating neuromuscular fatigue in people with stroke, and in 2014 her Doctorate of Philosophy investigating the effects of different forms of exercise rehabilitation in people with stroke. She has 20 years’ physiotherapy clinical and leadership experience in community, rehabilitation and acute healthcare settings; primarily working with people with neurological conditions. Nada is a Principal Investigator with the Medical Technologies Center for Research Excellence and recipient of a New Zealand Health Research Council Emerging Researcher Award (2019) and the AUT Vice-Chancellor's Award for Research Excellence-Emerging Researcher (2019). Her research focuses on innovation in rehabilitation clinical practice and the development of novel technologies to augment rehabilitation. Nada teaches on the physiotherapy undergraduate programme and the rehabilitation post-graduate programmes. She currently supervises seven post-graduate students at Masters and Doctorate level from clinical, design and engineering backgrounds.

Research interests:

Stroke Rehabilitation
Neurological Rehabilitation
Rehabilitation Technology
• Rehabilitation Robotics
• Brain Computer Interfaces
• Wearable devices
Exercise Rehabilitation
Neuromodulation
Motor Control and Motor Learning

Fields of research:

  • Medical Devices
  • Physiotherapy
  • Rehabilitation and Therapy (Excl. Physiotherapy)
  • Motor Control
  • Neurosciences
  • Neurology and Neuromuscular Diseases

Professional activities:

Appointment, affiliation, and membership

  • Leading Researcher, Auckland University of Technology (2020 - ongoing)
  • Associate Head of Research, School of Clinical Sciences, AUT (2019 - ongoing)
  • Postgraduate Research Committee, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences, AUT (2019 - ongoing)
  • Honorary Research Associate, Victoria University of Wellington (2019 - ongoing)
  • Clinical Advisor, Advisory Board, Beyond Capital Limited (2019 - ongoing)
  • Co-Lead, Assistive and Rehabilitative Technologies Theme, Medical Technologies Centre of Research Excellence (2018 - 2019)
  • Principal Investigator, Medical Technologies Centre for Research Excellence (2017 - ongoing)
  • Co-Director, Rehabilitation Innovation Centre, AUT (2016 - ongoing)

Award, prize, fellowship, and scholarship

  • Women and Leadership New Zealand Scholarship, WLNZ (2019 - 2021)
  • AUT Excellence Award for Emerging Researcher, Auckland University of Technology (2019)
  • Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences Research Excellence Award for Emerging Researcher, Auckland University of Technology (2019)
  • Maurice and Phyllis Paykel Trust Scholarship, Maurice and Phyllis Paykel Trust (2018)
  • C-Prize Wearable Technologies Finalist (Rehabilitation Innovation Team), Callaghan Innovation (2017)
  • Best Design Awards-Bronze, Designers Institute of New Zealand (2016)
  • Best Platform Presentation, No Tech to Go Tech: Stroke Rehabilitation Conference Christchurch, New Zealand (2015)
  • Ulu manu (War club) and Ula fala (Orators adornment) in recognition of support to Pacifica students, AUT Pacfica Physiotherapy Students (2013)
  • New Zealand Disability Research Scholarship, Health Research Council of New Zealand (2009 - 2012)

Contribution to academic environment

  • Content developer for community outreach showcase, Medical Technologies Centre of Research Excellence (2016)

Research outputs:

Books

  • Stavric, V., Towersey, N., Saywell, N., Stretton, T., Stewart, J., & Signal, N. (2017). Neuro Toolbox: A guide to physiotherapy assessment and treatment techniques in neurological populations. Auckland, New Zealand: AUT University.

Journal articles

  • Olsen, S., Signal, N., Niazi, I. K., Rashid, U., Alder, G., Mawston, G., . . . Taylor, D. (2020). Peripheral electrical stimulation paired with movement-related cortical potentials improves isometric muscle strength and voluntary activation following stroke. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 14. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2020.00156

  • Choisne, J., Fourrier, N., Handsfield, G., Signal, N., Taylor, D., Wilson, N., . . . Besier, T. F. (2020). An unsupervised data-driven model to classify gait patterns in children with cerebral palsy. Journal of Clinical Medicine, 9(5). doi:10.3390/jcm9051432

  • Alder, G., Signal, N., Rashid, U., Olsen, S., Niazi, I. K., & Taylor, D. (2020). Intra- and inter-rater reliability of manual feature extraction methods in movement related cortical potential analysis. Sensors, 20(8). doi:10.3390/s20082427

  • Collis, J. M., Signal, N., Mayland, E., & Wright-St Clair, V. A. (2020). Influence of purposeful activities on upper extremity motor performance: A systematic review. OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health. doi:10.1177/1539449220912187

  • Rashid, U., Niazi, I. K., Jochumsen, M., Krol, L. R., Signal, N., & Taylor, D. (2019). Automated labeling of movement- related cortical potentials using segmented regression. IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering, 27(6), 1282-1291. doi:10.1109/TNSRE.2019.2913880

  • Jochumsen, M., Navid, M. S., Nedergaard, R. W., Signal, N., Rashid, U., Hassan, A., . . . Niazi, I. K. (2019). Self-paced online vs. cue-based offline brain-computer interfaces for inducing neural plasticity. Brain Sciences, 9(6). doi:10.3390/brainsci9060127

  • Kumari, N., Taylor, D., & Signal, N. (2019). The effect of cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation on motor learning: A systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 13. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2019.00328

  • Alder, G., Signal, N., Olsen, S., & Taylor, D. (2019). A systematic review of paired associative stimulation (PAS) to modulate lower limb corticomotor excitability: Implications for stimulation parameter selection and experimental design. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 13. doi:10.3389/fnins.2019.00895

  • Rashid, U., Niazi, I. K., Signal, N., Farina, D., & Taylor, D. (2019). Optimal automatic detection of muscle activation intervals. Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology, 48, 103-111. doi:10.1016/j.jelekin.2019.06.010

  • Rashid, U., Kumari, N., Taylor, D., David, T., & Signal, N. (2019). Gait event anomaly detection and correction during a split-belt treadmill task. IEEE Access, 7, 68469-68478. doi:10.1109/ACCESS.2019.2918559

  • McLaren, R., Signal, N., Lord, S., Taylor, S., Henderson, J., & Taylor, D. (2019). The volume and timing of upper limb movement in acute stroke rehabilitation: Still room for improvement. Disability and Rehabilitation. doi:10.1080/09638288.2019.1590471

  • Lemke, M., Rodríguez Ramírez, E., Robinson, B., & Signal, N. (2019). Motivators and barriers to using information and communication technology in everyday life following stroke: A qualitative and video observation study. Disability and Rehabilitation. doi:10.1080/09638288.2018.1543460

  • Rashid, U., Niazi, I. K., Signal, N., & Taylor, D. (2018). An EEG experimental study evaluating the performance of Texas instruments ADS1299. Sensors (Switzerland), 18(11). doi:10.3390/s18113721

  • Olsen, S. O., Signal, N., Niazi, I., Christensen, T., Jochumsen, M., & Taylor, D. T. (2018). Paired associative stimulation delivered by pairing movement-related cortical potentials with peripheral electrical stimulation: An investigation of the duration of neuromodulatory effects. Neuromodulation, 21(4), 362-367. doi:10.1111/ner.12616

  • Jochumsen, M., Rovsing, C., Rovsing, H., Cremoux, S., Signal, N., Allen, K., . . . Niazi, I. K. (2017). Quantification of movement-related EEG correlates associated with motor training: A study on movement-related cortical potentials and sensorimotor rhythms. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 11. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2017.00604

  • Taylor, D., Binns, E., & Signal, N. (2017). Upping the ante: Working harder to address physical inactivity in older adults. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 30(5). doi:10.1097/YCO.0000000000000349

  • Birch, N., Graham, J., Priestley, T., Heywood, C., Sakel, M., Gall, A., . . . Signal, N. (2017). Results of the first interim analysis of the RAPPER II trial in patients with spinal cord injury: Ambulation and functional exercise programs in the REX powered walking aid.. Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, 14.

  • Signal, N., McPherson, K., Lewis, G., Kayes, N., Saywell, N., Mudge, S., & Taylor, D. (2016). What influences acceptability and engagement with a high intensity exercise programme for people with stroke? A qualitative descriptive study. NeuroRehabilitation, 39(4). doi:10.3233/NRE-161382

  • Mudge, S., Rosie, J., Stott, S., Taylor, D., Signal, N., & McPherson, K. (2016). Ageing with cerebral palsy; what are the health experiences of adults with cerebral palsy? A qualitative study.. BMJ Open, 6(10). doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2016-012551

  • Jochumsen, M., Niazi, I. K., Signal, N., Nedergaard, R. W., Holt, K., Haavik, H., & Taylor, D. (2016). Pairing Voluntary Movement and Muscle-Located Electrical Stimulation Increases Cortical Excitability. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 10, 482. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2016.00482

  • Wilson, N. C., Signal, N., Naude, Y., Taylor, D., & Stott, N. S. (2015). Gait deviation index correlates with daily step activity in children with cerebral palsy. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 96(10). doi:10.1016/j.apmr.2015.05.024

  • Jochumsen, M., Signal, N., Nedergaard, R. W., Taylor, D., Haavik, H., & Niazi, I. K. (2015). Induction of long-term depression-like plasticity by pairings of motor imagination and peripheral electrical stimulation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 9. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2015.00644

  • Lewis, G. N., Signal, N., & Taylor, D. (2014). Reliability of lower limb motor evoked potentials in stroke and healthy populations: How many responses are needed?. Clinical Neurophysiology, 125(4). doi:10.1016/j.clinph.2013.07.029

  • Signal, N. E. J. (2014). Strength training after stroke: Rationale, evidence and potential implementation barriers for physiotherapists. New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy, 42(2).

  • Signal, N., Taylor, D., & McNair, P. J. (2008). Central and peripheral contributions to neuromuscular fatigue in people with stroke. Physical Therapy Reviews, 13(4).

  • Muir, A. L., Jones, L. M., & Signal, N. (2007). Is neuroplasticity promoted by task complexity?. New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy 37(3) 136-146, 37(3).

Conference contributions

  • Collis, J., Signal, N., Mayland, E., & Wright-St Clair, V. (2020). What is the influence of purposeful activities on upper extremity motor performance? A systematic review. In 12APFSSH/8APFSHT: Program & Abstract Book (pp. 617). Melbourne. Retrieved from https://apfssh2020.org/downloads/APFSSH-APFSHT-Program-&-Abstract-Book.pdf

  • Collis, J., Signal, N., Mayland, E., & Wright-St Clair, V. (2020). Activity recommendations in the first six weeks after surgical treatment of distal radius fracture: A systematic review. In 12APFSSH/8APFSHT: Program & Abstract Book (pp. 37). Melbourne. Retrieved from https://apfssh2020.org/downloads/APFSSH-APFSHT-Program-&-Abstract-Book.pdf

  • Olsen, S., Signal, N., Niazi, I., Mawston, G., Alder, G., Rashid, U., & Taylor, D. (2019). Paired associative stimulation delivered by pairing movement-related cortical potentials with peripheral electrical stimulation improves voluntary activation in people with stroke. In European Congress of NeuroRehabilitation. Budapest.

  • Olsen, S., Signal, N., Niazi, I., Mawston, G., Alder, G., & Taylor, D. (2019). Movement-related cortical potentials paired with peripheral electrical stimulation improves voluntary activation in people with stroke. In K. Hillman (Ed.), Proceedings of the 37th International Australasian Winter Conference on Brain Research, 2019 Vol. 37 (pp. 32). Queenstown. Retrieved from https://www.otago.ac.nz/awcbr/proceedings/otago718583.pdf

  • Olsen, S., Signal, N., & Taylor, D. (2019). A novel neuromodulatory intervention to improve neuromuscular control following stroke. In Brain Research New Zealand Conference. Auckland.

  • Ghani, U., Signal, N., & Taylor, D. (2019). EEG correlates of task difficulty: Development of an objective measure of cognitive workload. In K. Hillman (Ed.), Proceedings of the 37th International Australasian Winter Conference on Brain Research, 2019 (pp. 62). Queenstown. Retrieved from https://www.otago.ac.nz/awcbr/otago717176.pdf

  • Kumari, N., Taylor, D., Rashid, U., Vandal, A., Smith, P. F., & Signal, N. (2019). Can cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation influence motor learning in healthy adults?. In K. Hillman (Ed.), Proceedings of the 37th International Australasian Winter Conference on Brain Research, 2019 (pp. 66). Queenstown. Retrieved from https://www.otago.ac.nz/awcbr/otago717176.pdf

  • Olsen, S., Signal, N., Niazi, I., Mawston, G., Alder, G., & Taylor, D. (2019). Movement-related cortical potentials paired with peripheral electrical stimulation improves voluntary activation in people with stroke. In K. Hillman (Ed.), Proceedings of the 37th International Australasian Winter Conference on Brain Research, 2019 (pp. 32). Queenstown. Retrieved from https://www.otago.ac.nz/awcbr/otago717176.pdf

  • Signal, N., Scott, K., Taylor, D., & Kayes, N. (2019). What helps or hinders the uptake of new technologies into rehabilitation practice?. In Converging clinical and engineering research on neurorehabilitation III: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on NeuroRehabilitation (ICNR2018) Vol. 21 (pp. 265-268). Pisa: Springer Nature. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-01845-0

  • Rashid, U., Signal, N., Niazi, I. K., & Taylor, D. (2019). footpress: An open-source MATLAB toolbox for analysis of pedobarography data. In Converging clinical and engineering research on neurorehabilitation III: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on NeuroRehabilitation (ICNR2018) Vol. 21 (pp. 361-364). Pisa. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-01845-0_72

  • Scott, K., Signal, N., Taylor, D., & Kayes, N. (2018). Clinician’s perspectives on what influences uptake of new technologies into rehabilitation practice. In K. Christer, C. Craig, & D. Wolstenholme (Eds.), Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Design4Health (pp. 214-222). Sheffield. Retrieved from https://research.shu.ac.uk/design4health/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/664.pdf

  • Ramírez, E. R., Petrie, R., Chan, K., & Signal, N. (2018). A tangible interface and augmented reality game for facilitating sit-to-stand exercises for stroke rehabilitation. In Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on the Internet of Things. Santa Barbara. doi:10.1145/3277593.3277635

  • Signal, N. (2017). How much & How hard? Exploring the amount and intensity of actvity in community rehabilitation. In New Zealand Community Physiotherapists Conference. New Zealand.

  • Olsen, S., Signal, N., Niazi, I., Alder, G., & Taylor, D. (2017). From research laboratory towards clinical practice. Understanding patient perspectives of a novel neuromodulatory intervention. In New Zealand Rehabilitation Associate Conference. Christchurch.

  • Scott, K., Kayes, N., Signal, N., & Taylor, D. (2017). What helps or hinders the uptake of new technologies into rehabilitation practice?. In New Zealand Rehabilitation Association 2017. Christchurch.

  • Signal, N., Lang, C., English, C., & Godecke, E. (2017). Therapy dose, intensity and integrity: current challenges in stroke recovery. In Scientific Meeting of the Australasian Stroke Association. Queenstown.

  • Olsen, S., Signal, N., Niazi, I., Alder, G., Jochumsen, M., & Taylor, D. (2017). Measuring changes in neuromuscular control following neuromodulation. A feasibility study in people with stroke. In 27th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Stroke Society of Australasia. Queenstown.

  • Signal, N. (2017). Patient and clinician perspectives of intensity and dose in stroke rehabilitation. In Scientific Meeting of the Australasian Stroke Association. Queenstown.

  • Signal, N. (2017). How much and how hard? Exploring intensity and dose in stroke rehabilitation. In Scientific Meeting of the Australasian Stroke Association. Queenstown.

  • Signal, N., English, C., Kuys, S., Brauer, S., Mahendran, N., & Preston, L. (2017). Increasing physical activity and intensity of practice after stroke. In Scientific Meeting of the Australasian Stroke Association. Queenstown.

  • Scott, K., Kayes, N., Signal, N., & Taylor, D. (2017). Integrating new technology into rehabilitation practice. In MedTech CoRE and Brain Research New Zealand Joint Symposium. Auckland.

  • Choisine, J., Handsfield, G., Signal, N., Taylor, D., Wilson, N., Stott, S., & Besier, T. (2017). A data-driven model to classify gait pattern in children with cerebral palsy. In XXVI Congress of the International Society of Biomechanics (pp. 920). Brisbane. Retrieved from https://media.isbweb.org/

  • Scott, K., Signal, N., Taylor, D., & Kayes, N. (2017). My Users Keeper: Why value to clinicians must be designed into health technologies. In UX Homegrown. Auckland. Retrieved from https://www.uxhomegrown.co.nz/

  • Signal, N., Birch, N., Graham, J., Priestly, T., Heywood, C., Sakel, M., . . . Nunn, A. (2017). The feasibility, safety and acceptability of the REX robotic exoskeleton for ambulation and upper body exercise in people with SCI. In Rehab Week 2017- International Neurorehabilitation Symposium. London. Retrieved from http://www.rehabweek.org/2017/Documents/Poster%20schedule%20Final.pdf

  • Signal, N. (2017). Strength for task training to improve locomotor ability following stroke. In 2nd International Conference on Rehabilitation Sciences. Islamabad,.

  • Signal, N. (2017). Applying the principles of motor learning to exercise rehabilitation. In 2nd International Conference on Rehabilitation Sciences. Islmabad. Retrieved from https://icrsciences.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Program-ICRS-A4-Final.pdf

  • Olsen, S., Signal, N., Niazi, I., Alder, G., Jochumsen, M., & Taylor, D. (2017). Exploring measures of gait variability following neuromodulation. A feasibility study in people with stroke. In Minnesota Neuromodulation Symposium. Minneapolis.

  • Choisine, J., Handsfield, G., Signal, N., Taylor, D., Wilson, N., Stott, S., & Besier, T. (2016). Data-driven model to improve decision-making in AFO prescription and design for children with cerebral palsy: A preliminary study. In 10th Australasian Biomechanics Conference. Melbourne.

  • Signal, N. (2016). The Rehabilitation Innovation Centre: A novel approach to rehabilitation
    technology development. In Phyiotherapy New Zealand Conference: Abstracts. Auckland. Retrieved from https://pnz.org.nz/

  • Signal, N. (2016). Rehabilitation technology: The hype, the reality and the role of
    physiotherapists.. In Physiotherapy New Zealand Conference 2016. Auckland. Retrieved from https://pnz.org.nz/

  • Olsen, S., Signal, N., Niazi, I., Christensen, T., & Taylor, D. (2016). Brain Computer Interface-based Paired Associative Stimulation: An investigation of the duration of neuromodulatory effects.. In Physiotherapy New Zealand Conference 2016. Auckland: Physiotherapy New Zealand. Retrieved from https://pnz.org.nz/

  • Olsen, S., Signal, N., Niazi, I., Christensen, T., Jochumsen, M., & Taylor, D. (2016). Brain computer interface-based paired associative stimulation: An investigation of the duration of neuromodulatory effects. In MedTech CoRE Conference 2016. Auckland.

  • Taylor, D., Signal, N., Jochumsen, M., Cremoux, S., & Niazi, I. (2016). A framework for considering the voice of the users of BCI rehabilitation devices. In International Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) Meeting 2016. California. Retrieved from http://bcisociety.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/Workshops_5.9.pdf

  • Signal, N. (2015). Cardiovasular exercise after stroke. In South Island Regional Stroke Education Day. New Zealand.

  • Signal, N. (2015). Unpacking Rehabilitation: Differentiating between dose and intenisty. In South Island Regional Stroke Education Day. New Zealand: South Island Alliance.

  • Signal, N., Lewis, G., McPherson, K., & Taylor, D. (2015). Corticomotor excitability during functional motor tasks as a biomarker of neural plasticity. In Stroke Rehab: From No-Tech to Go-Tech Conference. Christchurch.

  • Taylor, D., Chamberlain, J., Signal, N., Scott, N., Kasabov, N., Capecci, E., . . . Hou, Z. G. (2015). Brain-computer interfaces for neuro rehabilitation. In 13th International Conference on Neuro- Computing and Evolving Intelligence (NCEI) 2015. New Zealand: Knowledge Engineering and Discovery Research institute.

  • Signal, N. (2015). Training intensity. In Physiotherapy New Zealand Neurological Special Interest Group Study Day. Auckland.

  • Olsen, S. A., Signal, N., Niazi, I. K., Christensen, T. M., & Taylor, D. (2015). An investigation of the duration of cortical excitability in healthy subjects​. In Australasian Winter Conference on Brain Research 2014. Queenstown.

  • Niazi, I. K., Signal, N., Jochumsen, M., Holt, K., Haavik, H., & Taylor, D. (2015). Investigating the Effect of Electrical Stimulation Modalities Paired with Cortical Potentials Generated by Motor Imagination and Motor Execution. In Australasian Winter Conference on Brain Research 2014. Queenstown.

  • Taylor, D., Niazi, I. K., Signal, N., Jochumsen, M., & Dremstrup, K. (2015). The Aalborg Brain Computer Interface: A protocol for inducing neural plasticity. In Stroke Rehab: From No-Tech to Go-Tech Conference. Christchurch.

  • Taylor, D., Niazi, I. K., Signal, N., Jochumsen, M., Demstrup, K., & Farina, D. (2015). A brain computer interface (BCI) intervention to increase corticomotor excitability in the lower limb in people with stroke. In World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress 2015. Singapore.

  • Signal, N., McPherson, K., Lewis, G., & Taylor, D. (2015). Training intensity: A barrier or facilitator to engagement in rehabilitation following stroke?. In World Confederation for Physical Therapy Congress 2015. Singapore.

  • Mackey, A. H., Wilson, N. C., Signal, N. E. J., Boocock, M. G., & Stott, N. S. (2014). Putting our best foot forward – The assessment of foot deformities in children with cerebral palsy. In 7th Biennial Australasian Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine Conference. Hunter Valley.

  • Signal, N., Lewis, G. L., Taylor, D., & McPherson, K. M. (2014). Identifying appropriate measures of neural plasticity in response to locomotor rehabilitation in people with stroke. In New Zealand Applied Neurosciences Conference. Auckland.

  • Niazi, I., Taylor, D., Signal, N., Demstrup, K., Jochumsem, M., & Farina, D. (2014). A movement related cortical potential protocol for inducing neural plasticity. In New Zealand Applied Neurosciences Conference. Auckland.

  • Signal, N., & Stavric, V. (2014). When the safe thing to do is taking a risk... High intensity training in the neurological population. In Physiotherapy New Zealand Conference 2014: Linking The Chain. Auckland.

  • Towersey, N. C. M., & Signal, N. (2014). Making sense of it...retraining somatosensation. In Physiotherapy New Zealand Conference 2014: Linking the chain. Auckland.

  • Wilson, N. C., Signal, N., Taylor, D. T., Mackey, A. H., & Stott, N. S. (2014). The Gait Deviation Index correlates with daily step activity in children with cerebral palsy. In 7th Biennial Australasian Academy of Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine Conference. .

  • Signal, N. (2013). Exercise training in people with stroke: Clinical wisdom from a research study. In New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists Neurosymposium. Wellington.

  • Signal, N., Lewis, G., Taylor, D., & McPherson, K. M. (2013). Are TMS-derived measures reliable markers of neural plasticity in people with stroke?. In Progress in Motor Control IX. Montreal.

  • Signal, N., Taylor, D., & McNair, P. (2009). The relationship between voluntary activation, strength and physical function in people with stroke.. In Proceedings of New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists Neurosymposium (pp. 29). Auckland.

  • Signal, N., Taylor, D., & Mc Nair, P. (2009). Central and peripheral contributions of neuromuscular fatigue in people with chronic stroke. In The Australian Journal of Physiotherapy Vol. 55 (pp. 20). Sydney.

  • Signal, N. E. J., Taylor, D., & McNair, P. J. (2009). Central and peripheral contributions to neuromuscular fatigue in people with chronic stroke. In The Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference Week. Sydney.

  • Towersey, N., & Signal, N. E. J. (2008). NeuroSkills Online: The development of a multimedia resource to enhance student learning. [Abstract]. .

  • Signal, N., Taylor, D., & McNair, P. (2008). The relationship between voluntary activation, strength and physical function in people with stroke. [Abstract]. .

  • Signal, N., & Boston, L. (2008). The relationship between fatigue and depression in people with multiple sclerosis. [Abstract]. .

  • Signal, N., Taylor, D., & Clay, L. (2005). The effect of modified constraint-induced movement therapy on motor recovery in chronic stroke. In Proceedings of the New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists Biennial Conference (pp. 23). Wellington.

  • Mo, B., & Signal, N. (2005). The reliability and correlation of measures of strength and function in people with stroke. In Proceedings of New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists Neurosymposium (pp. 36). Auckland.

  • Signal, N., Taylor, D., & McNair, P. (2005). Fatigue following stroke. Proceedings of New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists Neurosymposium, (pp42), Auckland, New Zealand.. In Proceedings of New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists Neurosymposium (pp. 42). Auckland.

  • Signal, N., Taylor, D., & Mc Nair, P. (2005). Central neuromuscular fatigue following stroke. In Proceedings of the 23rd International Australasian Winter Conference on Brain Research. Queenstown. Retrieved from http://psy.otago.ac.nz/awcbr/Abstracts/Abstracts2005.html

Reports

  • Alder, G., Signal, N., Taylor, D., Niazi, I., Rashid, U., Brebner, S., . . . Alsmefer, F. (2017). Rehabilitation Innovation Team, C-Prize Wearables Competition Team Journal. Auckland, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://www.cprize.nz/lab-books/rehab-innovation

  • Signal, N. (2013). ACTIV trial - Data Monitoring Committee Report June 2013.

Software

  • Towersey, N., & Signal, N. (2010). Neuroskills Online (Version 1) [Computer Software]. AUT University.

Theses

  • Signal, N. E. J. (2014). Strength for task training: A novel intervention to improve locomotor ability following stroke. (AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10292/8011

  • Signal, N. E. J. (2007). Neuromuscular fatigue in people with chronic stroke.

Oral presentations

  • Signal, N. (2013). The challenges of measuring neural plasticity in response to rehabilitation. Strategy for Advancing Research Seminar Series. Auckland, video links to Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin.

  • Signal, N. (2011). Strength for Task Training pilot study: Participant feedback. Auckland, New Zealand.

  • Signal, N. (2010). Sensory re-weighting: Advancing our understanding of the role of sensory inputs in balance. Auckland Balance Seminar. Auckland, New Zealand.

Working paper/discussions

  • Taylor, D., Signal, N., Jochumsen, M., & Niazi, I. K. (2015). The Movement Related Cortical Potential: an endogenous signal to drive a Paired Associative Stimulation Protocol. Hindawi. Retrieved from http://www.hindawi.com/

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