Amber Nicholson

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Lecturer

Phone: +64 9 921 9999 – ext: 5212

Email: amber.nicholson@aut.ac.nz

Qualifications:

  • 2012, Bachelor of Commerce (First Class Honours), University of Auckland Business School
  • 2004, Bachelor of Maori Business Development, Auckland University of Technology
  • 2001, Te Pokairua Te Reo Rumakanga, Manukau Institute of Technology

Memberships and Affiliations:

Teaching Areas:

  • Diversity
  • Leadership for change
  • Ethics and Sustainability

Research Areas:

  • Māori conceptualisations of wellbeing
  • Māori economy
  • Kaitiakitanga

Research Summary:

My PhD thesis, Arohia ngā tapuwae o ngā tūpuna: Heed the footprints of the ancestors, focuses on the revitalisation of Maori conceptions of the economy. I am exploring the ways that the energy of ancestral landscapes shapes modern day business. A Māori or Indigenous worldview involves spiritual and genealogical ties to the Earth and thus deepens the notion of what is referred to in modern business practice as sustainability.

Publications:

  1. Nicholson, A., Spiller, C., & Pio E. (2018). Ambicultural Governance: Harmonizing Indigenous and Western Approaches. Journal of Management Inquiry, 27(4). http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1056492617707052
  2. Dell, K., Staniland, N., & Nicholson, A. (2018). Economy of Mana: Where to next? MAI Journal: A New Zealand Journal of Indigenous Scholarship, 7(1). https://doi.org/10.20507/MAIJournal.2018.7.1.5
  3. Spiller, C., & Nicholson, A. (2017). Wakatū incorporation: Balancing kaitiaki stewardship and commerce. In SAGE business cases. SAGE.
  4. Hēnare, M, Lythberg, B., Woods, C., & Nicholson, A. (2017). Te ohu umanga Māori: Temporality and intent in the Māori entrepreneurial team. In C. Ben-Hafaïedh and T.M. Cooney (eds), Research Handbook on Entrepreneurial Teams: Theory and Practice (pp. 208-230). Cheltenham, UK: Edward Elgar, pp. 208–30.
  5. Hēnare, M., Lythberg, B., Nicholson, A., Horan, J., Longmuir, K., & Peni, T. (2017). Janssen responsiveness — Understanding cultural drivers that impact on health disparities for Māori in Aotearoa-New Zealand. Mira Szászy Research Centre, University of Auckland Business School.
  6. Spiller, C., Seelau, R., Seelau, L., & Nicholson, A. (2016). Indigenous Governance: A review prepared for Auckland Council.
  7. Nicholson, A., Spiller, C., & Hēnare, M. (2015). Arohia te rangi o te hihiri: Heeding the melody of pure and potent energy. In C. Spiller & R. Wolfgramm (eds.) Indigenous spiritualties at work; transforming the spirit of business enterprise. Charlotte, NC: Information Age Publishers, pp. 273-298.