Dr C. Erik Landhuis

Senior Lecturer; Programme Leader BA Psychology, Deputy Head of School

Phone: +64 9 921 9999 ext 6645

Email: erik.landhuis@aut.ac.nz

Physical Address:

Room 1406, Level 14
AUT Tower
corner of Wakefield and Rutland streets
Auckland Central.



Postal Address:

Private Bag 92006
Auckland 1142.



Qualifications:

  • PhD in Psychology from the University of Auckland
  • BA in Psychology (major) and Sociology (minor) from the University of Auckland.

Biography:

I am both a Lecturer and Programme Leader for the BA Psychology in the School of Social Sciences and Public Policy. I completed my PhD in Psychology at the University of Auckland, where I looked at emotional expression and its role in maintaining physical and psychological well-being in situations of prolonged stress.


While completing my PhD I worked as an Assistant Research Fellow with the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study at the University of Otago.


After completing my PhD I was awarded a Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship from the University of Otago, working in the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine investigating the bidirectional association between asthma and atopy and psychological well-being. I joined AUT as a Lecturer in Psychology in February 2010.


I have a passion for psychology as a scientific discipline and I enjoy teaching this interesting but challenging field. I am particularly interested in teaching research methodology and the scientific investigation of psychology, including experimental design, psychological assessment and psychometrics, and data analysis. Related to this, I have also developed an increasing interest scientific misconduct, scientific fraud, and the negative effects of pseudo-science on society.


I also hope to make a small but important contribution to unravelling the mysteries of the placebo effect. And completely unrelated to my other research areas, I am also interested in learning more about the facet of human cognition that we often refer to as 'creativity'.

Research Areas:

  • the role of emotions, emotional expression, and psychological health in the development and progression of physical disease
  • the role of psychological factors in the development and progression of atopic disease
  • the role of modifiable behaviours in the onset and progression of obesity
  • the importance of sleep as a health behaviour.

Publications:

  • Hancox, R., Landhuis, C. E., & Sears, M. (2013). Forceps birth delivery, allergic sensitisation, and asthma: a population-based cohort study. Clinical and Experimental Allergy. View paper pdf icon
  • Landhuis, C. E., Perry, D. K., & Hancox, R. J. (2012). Association between childhood and adolescent television viewing and unemployment in adulthood. Preventive Medicine, 54, 168-173. doi:10.1016/j.ypmed.2011.11.007
  • Hancox, R. J.,& Landhuis, C. E. (2011). Association between sleep duration and haemoglobin A1c in young adults. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.  doi:10.1136/jech-2011-200217
  • Hancox, R. J. & Landhuis, C. E. (2011). Correlation between measures of insulin resistance in fasting and non-fasting blood. Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome , 3:23. doi:10.1186/1758-5996-3-23
  • Dummer, J. F., Epton, M. J., Cowan, J .O., Cook, J. M., Condliffe, R., Landhuis, C. E., Smith, A. D., Taylor, D. R. (2009). Predicting corticosteroid response in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using exhaled nitric oxide. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 180, 846-852. doi:10.1164/rccm.200905-0685OC.
  • Landhuis C. E., Poulton R., Welch D., Hancox R. J. (2008). Childhood sleep-time and long-term risk for obesity: a 32-year prospective birth cohort study. Pediatrics, 122, 955-960. doi:10.1542/peds.2007-3521
  • Landhuis C. E., Poulton R., Welch D., Hancox R. J. (2008). Programming obesity and poor fitness: the long-term impact of childhood television. Obesity, 16, 1457-1459. doi:10.1038/oby.2008.205
  • Landhuis C. E., Poulton R., Welch D., Hancox R. J. (2007). Does childhood television viewing lead to attention problems in adolescence? Results from a prospective longitudinal study. Pediatrics, 120: 532-537. doi:10.1542/peds.2007-0978
Conference proceedings
  • Landhuis, C. E. And now, an item from our 'Duh! It's kinda obvious' department . . . Teen attention issues linked to childhood TV viewing. Invited Speaker; The Otago Media Workshop, Dunedin, New Zealand, April, 2010
  • Cowan, D. C., Cowan, J. O., Palmay, R., Landhuis, C. E., Taylor, D. R. Steroid responsiveness in relation to histological phenotype in asthma. Poster presentation; The American Thoracic Society International Conference, San Diego, USA, May, 2009.
  • Landhuis, C. E., Poulton R., Welch D., Hancox R. J. Childhood sleep-time and long-term risk for obesity: a 32-year prospective birth cohort study. Oral presentation; 6th Australasian Society for Behavioural Health and Medicine    Conference, Auckland, New Zealand, February, 2009.
  • Landhuis, C. E., Poulton R., Welch D., Hancox R. J. Childhood sleep-time and long-term risk for obesity: a 32-year prospective birth cohort study. Oral presentation; Dissemination Hui: Findings from the Dunedin Longitudinal Study, Dunedin, New Zealand, June 2008.
  • Landhuis, C. E., Poulton R., Welch D., Hancox R. J. Programming obesity and poor fitness: The long-term impact of childhood television. Oral presentation; Children’s Issues Centre Conference, Dunedin, New Zealand, June, 2007.
  • Landhuis, C. E. Time for a quantitative change: The effects of writing frequency in emotional disclosure. Poster presentation; The Eighth International Congress of Behavioral Medicine, Mainz, Germany, August, 2004.

Awards:

  • University of Otago, Dunedin School of Medicine Publication Award, 2009 (includes $1500 for personal career development).
  • University of Otago, Health Sciences Career Development Programme Postdoctoral Fellowship, 2009. $65,452 per annum for 2 years, plus $5000 per annum for conference attendance.
  • University of Otago Dunedin School of Medicine and Otago School of Medical Sciences Bequest Funds, 2007. $4700 (with Associate Professor Robert J Hancox and Associate Professor Rob McGee), to study the potential of written language as a predictor of physical and psychological health.
  • University of Auckland Graduate Research Fund, 2004. $3000 towards costs to attend the Eighth International Congress of Behavioral Medicine, Mainz, Germany.