Dr Philippa Smith

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Senior Lecturer; Research Manager — Institute of Culture, Discourse and Communication

Phone: +64 9 921 9999 ext 8276

Email: philippa.smith@aut.ac.nz

Postal Address:

School of Language and Culture
Faculty of Culture and Society
AUT University
Private Bag 92006
Auckland 1142
NEW ZEALAND.



Qualifications:

  • Doctor of Philosophy – Auckland University of Technology, New Zealanders on the Net: Discourses of National Identities in Cyberspace.
  • Master of Arts in Communication Studies (First class honours) – Auckland University of Technology, Desperately Seeking A National Identity: An Examination Of Narrative In The Heartland Television Series And Its Influence In Defining New Zealanders.
  • Studied Journalism at Auckland Technology Institute (now Auckland University of Technology)
  • BA (English Literature) – University of Auckland

Biography:

Philippa is a senior lecturer in the School of Language and Culture. Drawing on her earlier career in journalism and public relations, Philippa has developed her research interest in communication ranging from the level of language (critical discourse analysis) to a more macro approach investigating, for example, society’s use of new media.

In addition, Philippa is the Research Manager for the Institute of Culture, Discourse and Communication at AUT and has been one of the key researchers on the World Internet Project in New Zealand from 2007 – 2016 — a longitudinal research project that has tracked New Zealanders'use of the internet. All of the WIPNZ reports and associated publications from this period can be found at the Institute’s website. Other internet-related research Philippa has been involved in includes: the Online News Project, the Digital Inclusion Project and a report on New Zealanders with disabilities and their internet use, and the Virtual Voices Project.

Philippa was a visiting fellow at the Oxford Internet Institute (Oxford University) from September to December, 2018  where she researched freedom of expression on the internet https://www.oii.ox.ac.uk/people/philippa-smith/. She also gave presentations at the University of Swansea and the University of Lancaster during this time.

Philippa's research has been published in journals and books and she has presented at numerous conferences. She been an examiner of honours' dissertations and Masters' and doctoral theses from New Zealand universities and she has reviewed papers for a range of academic journals, abstracts for international conferences and research proposals for the AUT Doctoral Board and various committees both within the university and externally.

Philippa has been interviewed by a number of media outlets on communication topics:

Teaching Areas:

  • Masters' degree in English and New Media
  • Bachelor of Arts (English and New Media).

Research Areas:

  • Critical media studies
  • Communication, television and journalism
  • Identity politics
  • Internet studies
  • Discourse analysis.

Other research-related activities

  • Reviewer for The Australian Journal of Communication, Journalism, New Zealand Journal of Sociology, The Journal of Sociolinguistics, the Electronic Journal of Communication and Applied Journalism and Media Studies, the International Journal of Interpreter Education and the Journal for E-learning and Digital Media.
  • Abstract reviewer for NZ Discourse Conferences (2007, 2009, 2011, 2013, 2015), the Georgetown University Roundtable 2015, and the Sociolinguistics of Globalization Conference 2015, Hong Kong University.
  • Examiner of Honours and Masters' dissertations and doctoral theses since 2005 within AUT (eg School of Communication Studies, School of Health and Environmental Science) and externally (eg Victoria University and University of Canterbury.
  • Doctoral supervisor since 2015.

Publications:

Selected journal articles

  • Smith, P. and Sissons, H. (2016). Social media and a case of mistaken identity: A newspaper’s response to journalistic error. Journalism: Theory, Practice and Criticism. Online edition journals.sagepub.com/
  • Smith, P. (2016). 'New Zealand Passport Holder' versus 'New Zealander'? The marginalization of ethnic minorities in the news – a New Zealand case study. In Journalism: Theory, Practice and Criticism. 17(6), 694-710. journals.sagepub.com/
  • Smith, P., Grant, L., Conway, C and Narayan, V. (2016). Mobile devices and mobile learning: Shifting the mindset of teachers and learners. International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning. 29(4): 1-16. 
  • Smith, P. (2015). 'New Zealand Passport Holder' versus 'New Zealander'? The marginalization of ethnic minorities in the news – a New Zealand case study. In Journalism: Theory, Practice and Criticism. Online edition. jou.sagepub.com.ezproxy.aut.ac.nz
  • Smith, P. (2014). Review Essay: Carving a niche for minority language media studies not so easy. Of Gruffydd Jones, E. and Uribe-Jongbloed, E. (2013). Social Media and Minority Languages: Convergence and the Creative Industries. Bristol, UK: Multilingual Matters. Pacific Journalism Review, 20(1), 247-250.
  • Smith, P. (July, 2013). Book review of Jewish Lives in New Zealand: A History. Edited by Leonard Bell and Diana Morrow. In New Zealand Sociology. 28 (1).
  • Lustyik, K. and Smith, P. (2010). From The Simpsons to “The Simpsons of the South Pacific': New Zealand’s First Primetime Animation, bro' Town in Television and New Media 11(5) 331–349.
  • Smith, P., Smith, N., Sherman, K., Kripalani, K., Goodwin, I., Crothers, C. and Bell, A. (2008). The Internet: Social and demographic impacts in Aotearoa New Zealand. In Journal Observatorio 2(3) pp.307-330.
  • World Internet Project reports and associated publications – 2007, 2009, 2011, 2013 and 2015.

Selected book chapters

  • Lorenzo-Dus, N. and Smith, P. (2018). The visual construction of political crises: A news values approach. In M. Patrona (ed). Crisis and the Media: Narratives of Crisis across Cultural Settings and Media. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.
  • Sissons, H. and Smith, P. (2017). Sounding off or a sounding board? Comments sections of news websites as interactive spaces. In J. Thornborrow, M. Burger and R. Fitzgerald (eds). Digital Communication and Social Networks: Space, Place and Social Media.Brussels: DeBoeck.
  • Smith, P. and Bell, A. (2015). Media Discourse In Braber, N., Cummings, L. and Morrish, L. (Eds.) Exploring Language and Linguistics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  • Smith, P. (2013). Heroic endeavours: Flying high in New Zealand reality television. In Lorenzo-Dus, N. and Blitvich, P. (Eds.) Real Talk: Reality Television and Discourse in Action. Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Smith, P. (2012). Allan Bell – a biography. In Chapelle, C. A. (Ed.). The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics. (Online edition). Malden, Massachusetts: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Bell, A., and Smith, P. (2012). News discourse. In Chapelle, C. A. (Ed.). The Encyclopedia of Applied Linguistics. (Online edition). Malden, Massachusetts: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Goodwin I, Smith, N., Sherman, K., Crothers, C., Billot, J. and Smith, P. (2009). Internet use in New Zealand. In Cardoso, G., Cheong, A. and Cole, J. (Eds.). Implications for social change in World Wide Internet: Changing societies, Economies and Cultures. pp. 624-655. Macau: University of Macau.
  • Smith, P. (2009). Rebuilding New Zealand’s national identity: A critical discourse analysis of the role of the charismatic documentary presenter. Book chapter in 'Critical Discourse Analysis: An interdisciplinary perspective' T. Le (ed) Nova Publisher, New York.
  • Smith P. and Bell, A. (2008). English in mass communications: News discourse and the language of journalism. In Momma H., and Matto M. (Eds.). A Companion to the History of the English Language pp. 334-344. Malden, Massachusetts: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Smith, P. and Lustyik, K. (2008) The global popularity of animated sitcoms – 'bro'Town’ - New Zealand's answer to 'The Simpsons’. In Youth, Media and Culture in the Asia Pacific Region International Symposium. Cambridge Scholars Publishing: Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK.
  • Smith P. and Bell, A. (2007). Unravelling the web of discourse analysis.In Devereux, E. (Ed.) Media studies: Key issues and debates pp.78-100. London: Sage Publications.
  • King, B., Bridgman, G., Smith, P., Bell, A., King, A., Harvey, S., Crothers, C., and Hassall, I. (2003). Television Violence in New Zealand: A study of programming and policy in international context. Centre for Communication Research, AUT University.

Selected conference presentations

  • Smith, P. & Sissons, H. (2018). “Stupid bitches” and “old girls chewing the fat” – Female journalists and discourses of abuse online. British Association of Applied Linguistics Annual Conference. Held at St John’s University, York, UK,  6-8 September, 2018.
  • Smith, P. (2018). Bigotry online: Commenters responses to the ‘give nothing’ to racism campaign in New Zealand. A paper presented as part of a colloquium “The dark side of social media: From expression and perception to response and mitigation of intolerant and abusive content online" at the Sociolinguistics Symposium 22.  Held at University of Auckland, NZ. 27-30 June, 2018.
  • Smith, P. (2017). Seeking the lime light for political gain: Discourses of immigration in the NZ General Election. Paper presented at the 6th New Zealand Discourse Conference, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand. 6-9 December, 2017.
  • Sissons, H. & Smith P. (2017). "Shame on the Times!": Moral indignation and the construction of an online community of news readers. Paper presented at the International Communication Association’s 67th Annual Conference. Held at Hilton Hotel Conference Center, San Diego, US, 27 May, 2017.
  • Smith, P. (September, 2016). A "Gutenberg moment" or another example of New Zealand's disability digital divide? CADAAD critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis Across Disciplines conference. (5-6 September) University of Catania, Sicily, Italy.
  • Smith, P. & Lorenzo-Dus, N. (7-9 December, 2015) In times of crisis – the visual representation of political leaders in the news. Paper presented at the 5th New Zealand Discourse Conference, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland,
  • Sissons, H. & Smith, P. (8-10 July, 2015) Correcting the error: A newspaper’s response in the digital age. Australia and New Zealand Communications Association Conference. Rydges Hotel, Queenstown, NZ.
  • Aguirre, A. & Smith, P. (3-6 June, 2015). A change of face: Layout, meaning, and ideology in a newspaper home page and front page. The Sociolinguistics of Globalisation:[de]centering and [de]standardization conference. The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
  • Lorenzo-Dus, N. & Smith, P. (3-6 June, 2015). Leadership woes: Media representation of politicians in the emergence, development and resolution of political crises. The Sociolinguistics of Globalisation:[de]centering and [de]standardization conference. The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
  • Sissons, H. & Smith, P. (3-6 June, 2015). Mistaken identity: The consequences of journalistic transparency in online news. The Sociolinguistics of Globalisation:[de]centering and [de]standardization conference. The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.
  • Smith, P. (2014, September). ‘Don’t call me European - I’ve never been to Europe!’ Identity politics in post-colonial New Zealand. Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis Across Disciplines Conference (CADAAD). Budapest, Hungary.
  • Smith, P. (2014, September). Political discourse and the re-branding of NZ national identity. British Association of Applied Linguistics Conference. University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.
  • Smith, P., Grant, L., Conway, C., and Narayan, V. (2014, November). Exploring Mobile devices and the mobility of learners: the two sides of learner-generated content in tertiary education. The 4th Mobile Creativity and Mobile Innovation Symposium & Screening. Auckland, NZ.
  • Crothers, C., and Smith, P. (2013). NZ (National) Identity: some survey evidence. Sociological Association of Aotearoa New Zealand Conference: Re-imagining Sociology, Re-imagining Society." University of Auckland, Auckland. 9-11 Dec 2013.
  • Smith, P. (2013). From ordinary to extra-ordinary: New Zealanders on reality television. The Fourth New Zealand Discourse Conference, Auckland, AUT University 2-4 December, 2013.
  • Smith, P. (2013). Contesting journalistic practice in national identity representation in New Zealand. The 5th International Language in the Media Conference. Redefining journalism: Participation, practice, change. 28-30 September, 2013. Queen Mary University London.
  • Smith, P. (2010). Let’s be endemic like Trout, Sheep and Possums :) " - constructing self and nation online. Multimodality, Practice and Mediation: New Technologies, Workplaces, Identity, Time, Theory and Method. Conference at AUT University 6-8 December
  • Smith, P. (2009). The discursive construction of New Zealanders on the Net. The 2nd New Zealand Discourse Conference. AUT University, Auckland.
  • Lustyik, K. and Smith, P. (2007) “The Simpsons of the South Pacific:" Transnational media and diasporic cultural production. IAMCR Conference, Paris, France.
  • Smith, P. and Lustyik, K. (2006). The global popularity of animated sitcoms – Bro’Town - New Zealand’s answer to The Simpsons. Youth, Media and Culture Symposium, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. 30 Nov – 1 Dec 2006.
  • Smith, P. (2007). From Heartland to Here to Stay: The role of charismatic documentary presenters in national identity construction, Te Whanga Aronui The Council for the Humanities Congress 2007: Transformations '07: Composing the nation: ideas, peoples, histories, languages, cultures, economies. Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington.
  • Smith, P. and Lustyik, K. (2005). "The Simpsons of the South Pacific" – Capitalising on global cultural icons in the construction of bro'Town. New Zealand Communications Conference, Capitalising on Communication, in Wellington, 5-7 December, 2005.
  • Smith, P. (2005). Rebuilding New Zealand's national identity: A critical discourse analysis of the role of the charismatic documentary presenter. Critical Discourse Analysis Conference: International Conference on Critical Discourse Analysis: Theory into research University of Tasmania, Australia (November 2005).

Awards:

  • Faculty of Culture and Society annual award for excellence in research leadership, 2016. 
  • Faculty of Culture and Society award for excellence in team research in the World Internet Project in New Zealand, 2015.
  • Vice Chancellor's contestable PhD scholarship, Auckland University of Technology, 2006.
  • Grant from the Royal Society of New Zealand’s International Science and
    Technology Fund to attend the international partners’ meeting of the World Internet Project, Beijing, People’s Republic of China, July, 2006.
  • AUT Vice-Chancellors award for excellence in team research in the Television
    Violence in NZ project, 2004.
  • AUT School of Communications Studies award for excellence in Post-Graduate
    Research – Master of Arts in Communications Studies, Auckland University of Technology, 2003.