Dr Sue McNaughton

Lecturer

Phone: 09 921 9999 x7107

Email: smcnaugh@aut.ac.nz

Physical Address:
North Shore Campus
90 Akoranga Drive
Northcote
North Shore City



Postal Address:
Mail No. A-25
Private Bag 92006
Auckland 1142
New Zealand



Qualifications:

PhD, MEd, MBChB, Grad Dip Tchg(sec)

Biography:

My background is in medicine, mainly A and E, and I had a short stint as a secondary school teacher before becoming a clinical teaching assistant. I completed my Master of Education, became a lecturer and completed my PhD in 2015. I am married with three adult children and a dog. I enjoy playing, umpiring and coaching hockey, watching rugby and making quilts. 

Teaching Areas:

Interprofessional clinic facilitation
Interprofessional papers

Research Areas:

Interprofessional learning and practice
Integration of beliefs and values with practice
Clinical wisdom

Research Summary:

I am involved in collaborative interprofessional research into student, educator and client experiences of interprofessional learning in the Akoranga Integrated Health clinic. I am particularly interested in how students integrate their beliefs and values into clinical practice while learning and as graduates, how this can be developed across the curriculum, and how this relates to clinical wisdom. I have also conducted research into teamwork and academic identity.

Current Research Projects:

IP Diabetes Programme
IP Parkinsons Programme
Follow-up studies of IP graduates
Teamwork study 

Publications:

McNaughton, S., Barrow, M., Bagg, W., & Frielick, S. (2016). Capturing the integration of practice-based learning with beliefs, values, and attitudes using modified concept mapping. Journal of Medical Education and Curricular Development. doi.org/10.4137/JMECD.S30079

McNaughton, S. (2016). Developing pre-requisites for empathy: Increasing awareness of self, the body and the perspectives of others. Teaching in Higher Education (in press, doi:10.1080/13562517.2016.1160218.

McNaughton, S.M., & Billot, J. (2016). Negotiating academic teacher identity shifts during higher education contextual change. Teaching in Higher Education http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13562517.2016.1163669

McNaughton, S. (2016). Critical reflection: scaffolding social responsiveness for first-year students.  Reflective Practice doi:10.1080/14623943.2016.1159551

McNaughton, S.M. (2015). Students' formal reflections on early interprofessional teamwork. Focus on Health Professional Education, 16(3), 86-100. Retrieved from https://fohpe.org/FoHPE/issue/view/3

McNaughton, S.M. (2015). Accessing clinical wisdom:

Mapping clinical students' experiences of integrated learning.(Doctoral thesis, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2292/27828

McNaughton S.M., Westberry, N.C., Billot, J.M., & Gaeta, H. (2014). Exploring teachers’ perceptions of videoconferencing practice through space, movement and the material and virtual environments. International Journal of Multiple Research Approaches 8(1):87-99. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/ docview/1545506459? pq-origsite=summon

Westberry, N., McNaughton, S., Billot, J., & Gaeta, H. (2014). Resituation or resistance? Higher education teachers’ adaptations to technological change. Technology, Pedagogy and Education. doi:10.1080/1475939X.2013.8675

McNaughton, S.M. (2013). Competency discourses: an analysis of secondary and tertiary assessments.  Higher Education Research & Development, 32, 975-992. doi:10.1080/07294360.2013.806443

McNaughton, S. (2013). Implementing an interprofessional first-year teamwork project: some key reflections. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 27, 420-421. doi:10.3109/13561820.2013.794132