Professor Clare Hocking

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Professor

Phone: +64 9 921 9162

Email: clare.hocking@aut.ac.nz

Physical Address:

Room AA202, AUT North Campus, 90 Akoranga Drive, Northcote 0627, Auckland, New Zealand



Postal Address:
Department of Occupational Science and Therapy
School of Clinical Sciences
Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences
AUT University, Private Bag 92006
Auckland 1142, New Zealand


Qualifications:

Diploma in Occupational Therapy, Advanced Diploma in Occupational Therapy, Master of Health Science (Occupational Therapy), Doctor of Philosophy

Memberships and Affiliations:

  • Occupational Therapy New Zealand Whakaora Ngangahau Aotearoa
  • Chair of the World Federation of Occupational Therapists International Advisory Board: Human Rights
  • Person Centred Rehab Centre: Psychosocial Rehab and Community Participation Cluster
  • Adjunct Professor
    Chiang Mai University, Thailand, 2014-2015
  • Honorary Professor
    Plymouth University, Plymouth, UK, from 2011

Teaching Areas:

  • Occupational Science
  • Evidence & Practice

Research Areas:

  • Strategies used by people with health conditions to manage participation in everyday occupations at home and in the community
  • Occupational justice
  • Occupational perspective of health

Research Summary:

  • Executive Editor of the Journal of Occupational Science
  • Clare completed her Master of Health Science with the University of South Australia in 1997. Her research investigated Australian occupational therapists as object users over three decades from 1954. The results are published in Hocking, C., & Wilcock, A. (1997). Occupational therapists as object users: A history of Australian practice 1954-1995. Australian Occupational Therapy Journal, 44, 167-176
  • Clare’s PhD thesis, completed in 2004, continued that theme. It was titled The Relationship between Objects and Identity in Occupational Therapy: A Dynamic Balance between Rationalism and Romanticism and focused on British occupational therapists’ relationships with objects as the profession was being established in the United Kingdom
  • The thesis is available from http://aut.researchgateway.ac.nz/handle/10292/363

Current Research Projects:

Occupational Science and Human Rights

WFOT Minimum Standards for the Education of Occupational Therapists

Strategies people with a health condition devise to facilitate participation in everyday occupations

Current Postgraduate student research supervision


  • PhD: Ida Fin. How female PhD candidates from South East Asia manage their everyday lives in New Zealand
  • PhD: Stephanie Hessell. Housing modification eligibility discourses
  • PhD: Jenni Mace. Appreciative inquiry into families in temporary accommodation: Instilling hope and setting goals for a better future
  • PhD: Heleen Reid. Theoretical perspectives on occupation in the environment
  • PhD: Sandy Rutherford. Strategies people who have had a stroke use to participate in everyday occupations
  • PhD: Mary Silcock. What are the current dominant discourses shaping the Occupational Therapy profession in New Zealand: A critical discourse analysis
  • PhD: Catherine Swift. Communication in NZ families affected by parental chronic pain
  • PhD: Rita Robinson. Toilet training discourses in New Zealand
  • PhD: Cait Harvey. Therapist-parents teaching and learning process in paediatric occupational therapy
  • PhD: Melissa Evans. Community intervention after stroke
  • DHSc: Marie Chester. Experiences of providing and receiving short term loan equipment
  • DHSc: Brenda Flood. Interprofessional Practice and Education
  • DHSc: Carolyn Simmons Carlsson. Discourses of supervision for occupational therapists in Aotearoa New Zealand
  • DHSc: Yasmin Orton. How clinical governance discourses are affecting occupational therapists
  • DHSc: Annelize de Wet.  A model for health assistants
  • MHSc: Wendy Burrows. Experiences of using the PRPP assessment in Aotearoa New Zealand
  • MHSc: Maree Paterson. Strategies used by adults with mild traumatic brain injury to manage everyday
  • MHSc: Qi Liu. The switch on effect of Cognitive Stimulation Therapy
  • MHSC: Brigid Hitchock. Experience of parenting a child with DCD

Schedule:

Occupational Science Europe, Berlin 8-9 September 2017
OTNZ-WNA Conference Nelson 13-15 September 2017
WFOT Congress Capetown South Africa, 21-25 May 2018

Publications:

  1. Orton, Y. T., & Hocking, C. (2017). Clinical governance: Implications for occupational therapists in Aotearoa New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, 64(1), 4-8.
  2. Leadley, S., & Hocking, C. (2017). An occupational perspective of childhood poverty. New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, 64(1), 9-17.
  3. Hocking, C. (2017). Occupational justice as social justice: The moral claim for inclusion. Journal of Occupational Science, 24(1). doi:10.1080/14427591.2017.1294016
  4. Shordike, A., Hocking, C., Bunrayong, W., Vittayakorn, S., Rattakorn, P., Pierce, D., & Wright-St. Clair, V. (2017). Research as relationship: Engaging with ethical intent. International Journal of Social Research Methodology. doi:10.1080/13645579.2017.1287874
  5. Kim, H., & Hocking, C. (2017). A grounded theory of Korean immigrants’ experiences of re-establishing everyday activities in New Zealand. Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies. doi:10.1080/15562948.2016.1272732
  6. Horghagen, S., & Hocking, C. (2017). Shout out who we are! How might engagement in cultural activities enhance participation in everyday occupations for people in vulnerable life situations? In Eide, A. H., Josephsson, S., Vik, K., & Ness, N-E. (Eds.), Participation in health and welfare services: Professional concepts and lived experience. The role of health and welfare services. Oxon: Taylor and Francis, Routledge.
  7. Hocking, C., & Whalley Hammell, K. R. (2017). Process of assessment and evaluation. In M. Curtin, M. Eagan, & J. Adams (Eds.), Occupational therapy for people experiencing illness, injury or impairment: Promoting occupation and participation (7th ed.). Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone.
  8. Robinson, R., Hocking, C., & Payne, D. (2016). Toilet training discourses in 1950s Aotearoa New Zealand. New Zealand Sociology, 31(7), 94-114.
  9. Kim, H., & Hocking, C. (2016). Attending to immigrants’ everyday activities: A new perspective on ensuring Asian immigrants’ quality of life. Aotearoa New Zealand Social Work Journal, 28(3), 57-66.
  10. Evans, M., Hocking, C., & Kersten, P. (2016). Mapping the rehabilitation interventions of a community stroke team to the extended International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Core Set for Stroke. Disability and Rehabilitation (early online). doi:10.1080/09638288.2016.1239763
  11. Silcock, M., Campbell, M., & Hocking, C. (2016). How Western structures shape our practice: An analysis of the Competencies for Registration for Occupational Therapists in Aotearoa New Zealand 1990-2014. New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, 63(2), 4-12.
  12. Robinson, R., Hocking, C., & Payne, D. (2016). Toilet training practices and subjectivities in 1980s Aotearoa New Zealand. New Zealand Sociology, 31(1), 49-71.
  13. Jones, M., Hocking, C., & McPherson, K. (2016). Communities with participation-enabling skills: A study children with traumatic brain injury and their shared occupations. Journal of Occupational Science, 24(1). doi:10.1080/14427591.2016.1224444
  14. Tokolahi, E., Hocking, C., & Kersten, P. (2016). Development and content of a school-based occupational therapy intervention for promoting emotional well-being in children. Occupational Therapy in Mental Health. doi:10.1080/0164212X.2015.1129522 H Index: 13
  15. Tokolahi, E., Hocking, C., Kersten, P., & Vandall, A. (2016). Quality and reporting of cluster randomised controlled trials evaluating occupational therapy interventions: A systematic review. OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 36(1), 14-24. doi:10.1177/1539449215618625 2015 Impact Factor: 0.524
  16. Kim, H., & Hocking, C. (2016). The mutual relationship between immigrants’ disrupted everyday activities and their health: A grounded theory of experiences of Korean immigrants settling in New Zealand. Social Work in Public Health, 31(3), 113-126. doi:10.1080/19371918.2015.1087916 2015 Impact Factor: 0.396
  17. Kim, H., Hocking, C., McKenzie-Green, B., & Nayar, S. (2016). Occupational experiences of Korean immigrants settling in New Zealand. Journal of Occupational Science, 23(2), 181-195. doi:10.1080/14427591.2015.1126168
  18. Jones, M., & Hocking, C. (2016). Crossing the practice border: Participation skills for communities. In N. Pollard & D. Sakellariou (Eds.), Occupational therapies without borders: Integrating justice with practice (2nd ed.; pp. 498-505). St Louis, MI: Elsevier.
  19. Hocking, C., & Mace, J. (2016). Occupational science informing practice for occupational justice. In N. Pollard & D. Sakellariou (Eds.), Occupational therapies without borders: Integrating justice with practice (2nd ed.; pp. 228-236). St Louis, MI: Elsevier.
  20. Hocking, C., & Meltzer, P. (2016). Theoretical models relevant to gerontological occupational therapy practice. In K. F. Barney & M. A. Perkinson (Eds.), Occupational therapy with aging adults: Enhancing quality of life through collaborative practice (pp. 41-51). St Louis, MI: Elsevier.
  21. Wilcock, A. A., & Hocking, C. (2015). An occupational perspective of health (3rd ed.). Thorofare: Slack.
  22. Mace, J., Hocking, C., & Waring, M. (2015). Appreciative inquiry: Enabling occupation through the imaginative mind. In S. Nayar & Stanley, M. (Eds.), Qualitative research methodologies for occupational science and therapy (pp. 190-208). New York: Routledge. ISBN-13: 978-0415828673
  23. Jones, M., & Hocking, C. (2015). Case study methodology: The particular and the whole. In S. Nayar & Stanley, M. (Eds.), Qualitative research methodologies for occupational science and therapy (pp. 118-137). New York: Routledge. ISBN-13: 978-0415828673
  24. Hocking, C., Jones, M., & Reed, K. (2015). Occupational science informing occupational therapy. In I. Sӧderback (Ed.), International handbook of occupational therapy interventions (2nd ed., pp. 127-134). New York: Springer.
  25. O’Sullivan, G., Hocking, C., & McPherson, K. (2015). Translating knowledge into practice: An exploratory study of dementia specific training for community-based service providers. Dementia: The International Journal of Social Research and Practice. doi:10.1177/1471301215617867
  26. Hocking, C., & Townsend, E. (2015). Driving social change: Occupational therapists’ contributions to occupational justice. WFOT Bulletin, 71(2), 68-71. doi:10.1179/2056607715Y.0000000002
  27. Silcock, M., Hocking, C., & Payne, D. (2015). Governmentality within children’s technological play: Findings from a critical discourse analysis. Children and Society. doi:10.1111/chso.12123
  28. Orton, Y., Hocking, C., & Reed, K. (2015). Ideas occupational therapists take up from the international literature. New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, 62(1), 12-19.
  29. Campbell, A., Hocking, C., & Taylor, W. (2014). The experience of having psoriasis through the lens of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Australasian Journal of Dermatology, 55(4), 241-249. doi:10.1111/ajd.12103
  30. Hocking, C., Kronenberg, F., Nayar, S., Stanley, M., Wicks, A., Wilson, L., Wright-St Clair, V., & Erlandsson, L.-K. (2014). Addressing diverse occupational needs: What new knowledge do occupational therapists seek? New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, 61(2), 4-12.
  31. Tokolahi, E., Hocking, C., Kersten, P., & Vandal, A. C. (2014). Cluster-randomised controlled trial of an occupational therapy group intervention for children designed to promote emotional wellbeing: Study protocol. BioMed Central Psychology, 2(16).
  32. O’Sullivan, G., Hocking, C., & Spence, D. (2014). Dementia: The need for attitudinal change. Dementia, 13(4), 483-497. doi:10.1177/1471301213478241
  33. Hocking, C., Shordike, A., Vittayakorn, S., Bunrayong, W., Rattakorn, P., Wright-St. Clair, V., & Pierce, D. (2014). Different ways of doing food: Cultural influences on food preparation. In D. Pierce (Ed.), Occupational science for occupational therapy (pp. 133-142). Thorofare, NJ: Slack.
  34. White, A., Hocking, C., & Reid, H. (2014). How occupational therapists engage adults with cognitive impairments in assessments. British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 77(1), 2-9. doi:10.4276/030802214X13887685335427     
  35. O’Sullivan, G., Hocking, C., & Spence, D. (2014). Action research: Changing history for people with dementia in New Zealand. Action Research Journal, 12(1), 19-35. doi:10.1177/1476750313509417
  36. Swift, C. M., Reed, K. & Hocking, C. (2014). A new perspective on family involvement in chronic pain management programs. Musculoskeletal Care, 12, 47-55. doi:10.1002/msc.1059
  37. Campbell, A., Hocking, C., & Taylor, W. (2013). The experience of having psoriasis through the lens of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Australasian Journal of Dermatology. doi:10.1111/ajd.12103
  38. Rutherford, S. J., Theadom, A., Jones, A., Hocking, C., Feigin, V., Krishnamurthi, R., Kent, B., Barker-Collo, S., & McPherson, K. M. (2013). Capturing the stories behind the numbers: The Auckland Regional Community Stroke Study (ARCOS IV), a qualitative study. International Journal of Stroke. doi:10.1111/ijs.12164
  39. Silcock, M., Hocking, C., & Payne, D. (2013). Childhood constructions of contemporary technology: Using discourse analysis to understand the creation of occupational possibilities. Journal of Occupational Science. doi:10.1080/14427591.2013.832647
  40. O’Sullivan, G., & Hocking, C. (2013). Translating action research into practice: Seeking occupational justice for people with dementia. OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health, 33(3), 168-176. doi:10.3928/15394492-20130614-05
  41. Wright-St. Clair, V., & Hocking, C. (2013). Occupational science: The study of occupation. In B. A. Boyt Schell, G. Gillen, M. E. Scaffa, &, E. S. Cohn (Eds.), Willard and Spackman’s occupational therapy (12th ed., pp. 82-94). Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
  42. Wright-St. Clair, V. A., Pierce, D., Bunrayong, W., Rattakorn, P., Vittayakorn, S., Shordike, A., & Hocking, C. (2013). Cross-cultural understandings of festival food-related activities for older women in Chiang Mai, Thailand, Eastern Kentucky, USA and Auckland, New Zealand. Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology. doi:1 0.1007/s10823-013-9194-5
  43. Hocking, C. (2013). Occupation for public health. New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, 60(1), 33-37.
  44. Reed, K., Hocking, C., & Smythe, L. (2013). The meaning of occupation: Historical and contemporary connections between health and occupation. New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy, 60(1), 38-44.
  45. O’Sullivan, G., Hocking, C., & Spence, D. (2013). Dementia: The need for attitudinal change. Dementia. Early Online. doi:10.1177/1471301213478241
  46. Hocking, C. (2013). Contribution of occupation to health and well-being. In B. A. Boyt Schell, G. Gillen, M. E. Scaffa, &, E. S. Cohn (Eds.), Willard and Spackman’s occupational therapy (12th ed., pp. 72-81). Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
  47. Hocking, C., & Kroksmark, U. (2013). Sustainable occupational responses to climate change through lifestyle choices. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 20, 111-117. doi:10.3109/11038128.2012.725183
  48. Whiteford, G. E., & Hocking, C. (Eds.). (2012). Critical perspectives on occupational science: Society, inclusion, participation. Oxford, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
  49. Sutton, D. J., Hocking, C. S., & Smythe, L. A. (2012). A phenomenological study of occupational engagement in recovery from mental illness. Canadian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 79(3), 142-150. doi:10.2182/cjot.2012.79.3.3
  50. Vincent, R., & Hocking, C. (2012). Factors that might give rise to musculoskeletal disorders when mothers lift children in the home. Physiotherapy Research International, (Published online). doi:10.1002/pri.1530
  51. Hocking, C. (2012). Occupational science. In M. D. Gellman & J. R. Turner (Eds.), Encyclopedia of Behavioural Medicine (pp. 1365-1371). New York: Springer-Verlag. Online version available at http://referencelive.springer.com

 

Awards:

  • Ruth Zemke Lecture in Occupational Science from the Society for the Study of Occupation: USA, 2008
  • World Federation of Occupational Therapists Merit Award for exemplary service to the Federation, 2006
  • Co-Recipient of the AUT Vice Chancellor’s Award for the Best Research Team, with Valerie Wright-St. Clair. 2004
  • NZAOT Frances Rutherford Lectureship Award, 2003