AUT - Who's Who

AUT

Who's Who

Paul MountfortPaul Mountfort
is Chair of the Centre for Creative Writing at AUT. He is author of Nordic Runes and Ogam — books on the uses of ancient scripts in arts, letters and the imagination.
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James GeorgeJames George
(mentor, senior lecturer) is a novelist, short story writer and author of Wooden Horses and award winning Zeta
Orionis. More >>
Mike JohnsonMike Johnson
Mike Johnson (mentor; senior lecturer) has over a dozen full-length novels, short story collections and books of poetry to his name.
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Nick WardNick Ward
(mentor) is currently one of New Zealand's most prolific writers. His first film 'Stickmen' sold to 26 countries around the world and is widely quoted as a favourite New Zealand film.
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Siobhan HarveySiobhan Harvey
(mentor, guest lecturer) is a poet, prose writer, editor, reviewer, and teacher. She has worked as a creative writing teacher in Manchester (UK).
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Dylan Horrocks. Dylan Horrocks
(mentor) is New Zealand’s most celebrated graphic novel (comics) artist. He is author of the Hicksville, the comic book series Pickle and Atlas.
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Andrew Bancroft. Andrew Bancroft
is a writer, director, and producer of film and TV. He has won major national and international awards.
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Darryl Hocking. Darryl Hocking
(exegesis supervisor) senior lecturer is a discourse analyst with a background in art and design and a special interest in discourses of creativity.
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Bianca Zander. Bianca Zander
(mentor, guest lecturer) is a novelist, screenwriter, script consultant and journalist.
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Paul Mountfort

Paul Mountfort (PhD English, University of Auckland) is Chair of the Centre for Creative Writing at AUT.

He is author of Nordic Runes (Vermont, US: ITI, 2003) and Ogam (Random House, UK: 2001), full-length books on the uses of ancient scripts in arts, letters and the imagination. His primary research interests are in the oracle-text as a popular genre, a subject about which he has both written widely and spoken to at numerous conferences, including (American) Popular Culture Association annual conferences in San Diego, Atlanta, San Francisco and New Orleans.

He is currently contracted for two further books with Edwin Mellen Press (New York), and in 2009 was a visiting scholar at Shanghai Normal University and Tianjin University of Commerce. In 2010 he is the Area Chair of Graphic Novels, Comics and Visual Cultures for the PopCAANZ (Popular Culture Association Australia/New Zealand) conference in June/July, Sydney.

Paul is the founding programme leader of AUT's BA English and New Media Studies and BA Creative Writing programmes, and was recipient of the sole inaugural Vice Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching (2006).

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James George

James George (mentor, senior lecturer) is a novelist and short story writer of Ngapuhi, English and Irish descent. He is author of Wooden Horses (Hazard Press, 2000), Zeta Orionis (an excerpt from his second novel Hummingbird) which won the premiere award in the 2001 Maori Literature Awards and was a finalist in the Montana New Zealand Book Awards 2004 and for the 2005 Tasmania Pacific Fiction Prize.

Writing in the NZ Herald Margie Thomson describes Hummingbird as 'demanding and ambitious … [and] above all incredibly moving'. Ocean Roads (Huia, 2006) appeared on The 2007 Commonwealth Writers' Prize Shortlist as one of the Best Books in the South East Asia and South Pacific region and was been shortlisted in the fiction category of the Montana New Zealand Book Awards 2007.

He has also contributed 'Figures on Ice' to The Best of New Zealand Fiction. Volume Three (Vintage, 2006), and has taught and mentored on both AUT and University of Auckland's Master of Creative Writing programmes

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Darryl Hocking

Darryl Hocking (exegesis supervisor; senior lecturer) is a discourse analyst with a background in art and design and a special interest in discourses of creativity. He has worked with some of the top researchers in his field in the world.

Darryl is currently completing a Doctor of Philosophy at Macquarie University (Sydney) which explores the linguistic and rhetorical characteristics of the 'brief' genre, its conditions of production and reception, and how these impact on and discursively facilitate student creative action. This research is being supervised by Professor Emeritus Christopher N. Candlin.

He is also a musician with the Auckland band Snake Salvador, which has received considerable air-time recently. His research into exegesis in the art and design context informs his supervision of the creative writing exegesis component.

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Dylan Horrocks

Dylan Horrocks (mentor) is New Zealand's most celebrated graphic novel (comics) artist. He is author of the Hicksville (VUP, 2010), the comic book series Pickle (Black Eye, 1992-1997) and Atlas (Drawn & Quarterly, 2001-2006), and numerous short comics published in books and magazines around the world. He has also written for DC Comics, including Batgirl and Vertigo's Hunter: The Age of Magic.

His satirical strip 'Milo's Week' appeared in the NZ Listener in 1995-1997 and a selection of his political cartoons, Better Luck Next Century, was published in 2001 (Top Shelf). He has also written and lectured widely about comics, writing and art. He publishes work online Hicksville Comics.

Back to topAndrew Bancroft

Andrew Bancroft has directed, written and produced for film, television and theatre.

His first film was Made Man, a short science-fiction/comedy about a man having a baby. It won Best Comedy at the 1994 NZ Short Film Awards and also Best Performance by a Newcomer.

His second film, Planet Man, became the first NZ film to win at the Cannes Film Festival (International Critics Prize for Best Short Film). It was a futuristic tale about a night when all the women in the world mysteriously vanished.

His other short films include Home Kill (in competition at the Munich Film Festival), Making The Rain Breathe (a children's story commissioned by Canal Plus, France), and the recent psychological drama An Occasional Kiss.

In 2004-6, Andrew was an executive producer for the Short Film Fund of the NZ Film Commission. He developed screenplays and co-supervised production of five high-budget short films, three of which have been selected by the Cannes Film Festival, a record which is unlikely to be surpassed.

Andrew co-wrote (with Māori playwright Hone Kouka) the screenplay for a one-hour TV movie called Signatures: Ngā Tohu. Andrew also directed it, and it swept the NZ Film & Television Awards in 2000 (Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actor)

Andrew has received substantial sums from the NZ Film Commission to develop screenplays for feature films. He has also trained as a Script Analyst with the UK's ARISTA organisation, and has worked as a script consultant for feature films for both sides of the Tasman. He has taught screenwriting for the NZ Writers Guild and the NZ Film Commission.

Andrew began writing & directing documentaries in 2002. His first, Mine Eyes Dazzle, was a finalist in the NZ Film & Television Awards for Best Director, Documentary.

Prior to working in the film industry, Andrew wrote and directed for the stage. He has worked as a dramaturge, developing new plays for the Auckland Theatre Company, and has lectured at Unitec and the University of Auckland.
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Mike Johnson

Mike Johnson (mentor; senior lecturer) has over a dozen full-length novels, short story collections and books of poetry to his name.

His novels are Lear — The Shakespeare Company Plays Lear at Babylon (1986), Anti Body Positive (1987), Foreigners: Three Novellas (1991), Lethal Dose (1991) Dumb Show (1996), Counterpart (2001), and Stench (2004). He has tutored creative writing for over 20 years at the University of Auckland, most recently as a mentor on their Master of Creative Writing programme, and has been writer in residence at both Auckland and Canterbury universities.

His prose has been described "in terms of magic realism, though with a distinctive science fiction component, influenced by such US writers as Philip K. Dick and Barry M. Maltzberg, and with idiosyncratic Gothic elements. By contrast, his poetry is minimalist with flashes of lyricism, formerly in the style of Robert Creeley and translations of Chinese poets, though increasingly in the elusive manner of Pablo Neruda."

He has been instrumental in the establishment of AUT's BA Creative Writing and lectured on both AUT and the University of Auckland's Master of Creative Writing English programmes.

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Siobhan Harvey

Siobhan Harvey (mentor, guest lecturer) is a poet, prose writer, editor, reviewer, and teacher. She has worked as a creative writing teacher in Manchester (UK), University of Auckland, and now AUT.

She is poetry editor of Takahe magazine, consulting editor for International Literary Quarterly and she has been the National Coordinator of National Poetry Day since 2009. Her writing has appeared in a wide range of national and international publications, including Landfall, International Literary Quarterly, NZ Listener, The Press, and Meanjin.

Her writing also features in several anthologies, including Swings and Roundabouts: Poems about Parenting (Godwit, 2008), and A Good Handful: Poems about Sex (AUP, 2008). Her work has been broadcast on Radio New Zealand. In 2009 she was Auckland Regional Council Writer in Residence at Awhitu Reserve, and in 2008 she was runner-up in the inaugural Bernard Gadd Memorial Poetry Prize, and runner-up again in 2009.

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Nick Ward

Nick Ward (mentor) is currently one of New Zealand's most prolific writers. His first film 'Stickmen' sold to 26 countries around the world and is widely quoted as a favourite New Zealand film.

It won awards for best director, best actor, best supporting actor and best screenplay at the New Zealand film awards. Most importantly, it was the springboard that helped Nick make the move to being a full-time writer. His most recent film, 'Second Hand Wedding', has just become New Zealand's seventh highest grossing local film, just in front of 'Goodbye Pork Pie'.

He has also written episodes and developed storylines for New Zealand's favourite TV series 'Outrageous Fortune'. His most notable recent writing work can be seen in another popular TV series — 'Nothing Trivial'.

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Bianca Zander

Bianca Zander (mentor, guest lecturer) is a novelist, screenwriter, script consultant and journalist. She is the author of The Girl Below (2012), published to critical acclaim in New Zealand, the UK and the United States, where it was a semi-finalist for the VCU Cabell First Novelist Award.

She was the 2012 recipient of the Creative New Zealand Louis Johnson New Writers' Bursary, and her second novel, The Predictions, will be published in the United States in 2015.For two years, Bianca was a staff writer for the Listener magazine and has since then contributed to a wide range of magazines, newspapers and websites.

In addition, Bianca has produced radio shows and written for film and television. In 2004, she wrote and co-directed The Freedom Flat, a finalist in the DOCNZ awards, and in 2009, she wrote the dramatic short film The Handover, which screened in competition at the Chicago Film Festival and Encounters, Bristol.

In 2007, she co-scripted the cross-platform drama series My Story, which received an innovation award from NZ On Air. As well as lecturing in Creative Writing, Bianca is a script consultant for the New Zealand Film Commission.

Last updated: 14 Mar 2014 3:00pm

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