AUT - Tony MacCulloch

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Dr Tony MacCulloch

Senior Lecturer ATB - Nursing

Phone: +64 9 9219999 ext. 7116

Email: TMACCULL@aut.ac.nz

Physical Address:
Room AA251
North Shore Campus
90 Akoranga Drive
Northcote
North Shore City

Qualifications:

PhD, MEd, PG DipCouns, RN

Memberships and Affiliations:

Member of Association for Humanistic Psychology

Member New Zealand Nurses Association

Teaching Areas:

Mental Health Nursing

Professional Supervision

Participatory research

Critical discourse analysis

Research areas:

Research expertise

Several themes characterize my research expertise. The first is grounded in participatory forms of qualitative research that range from the use of focus groups and interviews as specific participatory methods, to full use of ‘Cooperative Inquiry’ that involves participants and the researcher in all stages of the research process from initial idea generation, through planning, implementation, data interpretation and findings dissemination. The democratic nature of this approach embraces meaningful collaboration and partnership in the creation of epistemologically sound knowledge. My Masters research used a modified qualitative participatory approach to explore educators experience of challenging dominant hegemony.

My second area of research expertise focuses on critical discourse analysis. It draws on broad critical theory foundations in tandem with transformative, emancipatory and interpersonal themes. Its concerns relate to political, social, and psychological processes that shape, inform, regulate and manipulate the transmission and reception of ideas, information and perception of individuals and wider social groups. My PhD research utilised Critical Discourse Analysis to interrogate discourses of emotional competence across a range of disciplines and texts.

Research interests

A professional background incorporating general and psychiatric nursing practice, counselling and nursing education has combined to create a wide-ranging and interdisciplinary field of knowledge and expertise. This breadth is reflected in significant features of my research interests. Publications, conference presentations and masters thesis supervision and examination reflect a diverse range of interests relating to nursing, health care and tertiary education. Particular interests include communication and interpersonal skills, counselling approaches, emotional competence, professional supervision, mental health, discourses within healthcare, and service-user perspectives. I contribute to a regular column and review articles for publication in ‘Issues in Mental Health Nursing’.

Publications:

MacCulloch, T. (2012) A critical discourse analysis of emotional competence explores ‘mappings’ of the interior. Poster presented at the Interprofessional Health Studies Conference, AUT University, North Shore Campus, Akoranga Drive, Auckland, NZ. 13-15th August

MacCulloch, T. (2012) Reflections on trust and self-disclosure, Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 33:59–60.

MacCulloch, T. (2011) Maps, metaphors and mind control: a CDA approach to challenging constructs of emotional competence. Paper presented at the Third New Zealand Discourse Conference, AUT University; 5-7 Dec 2011.

MacCulloch, A. (2011) Mappings of the interior: a critical discourse analysis of emotional competence. PhD thesis, AUT University, Auckland, NZ.

MacCulloch, T. (2011) Flourishing: A vision for everybody. Issues in Mental Health Nursing.          32:325.

MacCulloch, T. (2011) Recovery and the rhetoric of illusion. Issues in Mental Health Nursing.       32(3):187-8.

MacCulloch, T. (2010) Constructions of Truth, Gate-Keeping and the Power of Diagnostic Labels. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 31:151–152.

Smythe, E., MacCulloch, T., Charmley, R. (2009).       Professional supervision: trusting the wisdom that 'comes' . British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 37(1), 17-25.

MacCulloch, T., Shattell, M. (2009) Reflections of a “Wounded Healer”, Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 30:2,135-137.

MacCulloch, T., Shattell, M. (2009) Clinical Supervision and the Well-Being of the Psychiatric Nurse. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 30:9,589-590

 MacCulloch. T. (2008) Context is everything. Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 29:89–93,

MacCulloch, T. (2008) 'We all have mountains to climb', Issues in Mental Health Nursing, 29:6, 671-673

MacCulloch,T. (2007) In Praise of Unsung Heroes. Issues in Mental Health Nursing            Journal. 28: 319-321

MacCulloch,T. (2007) Gifts of inspiration. Issues in Mental Health Nursing Journal.            28:547-549.

MacCulloch,T. (2007) The gift of compassion. Issues in Mental Health Nursing Journal.    28:825-827

MacCulloch,T. (2007) An urgent quest for something better. Issues in Mental Health Nursing Journal, 28:1193-1196.

MacCulloch, T. (2002) Facilitating a dream: the quest for human flourishing, in Yourn, B.,                Little, S. (Eds) Walking to different beats. Palmerston North, New Zealand. Dunmore Press.

MacCulloch, T. (2004) Creative designs for teacher appraisal: an alternative to orthodoxy in Yourn, B., Little, S. (Eds)       Walking to different beats. Palmerston North, New Zealand. Dunmore Press.

MacCulloch, T. (1999) ‘Countering hegemonic oppression in tertiary education: risks and strategies for the transformative educator’, Unpublished thesis. Auckland University, Auckland, NZ.

MacCulloch, T. (1999) Case Study ‘The sadness of loss and saying goodbye’ in ‘Talking Cures – a guide to the psychotherapies for health care professionals’, Edited by Phil Barker (1999), London, Nursing Times Books. p. 73-80.

MacCulloch, T. (1998) Feature article ‘Emotional Competence in Professional Practice’ Australian and New Zealand Journal of Mental Health Nursing, Vol 7, Number 2,

Awards:

AUT Distinguished Teachers Award 2001
Last updated: 22-Aug-2014 9.13am

The information on this page was correct at time of publication. For a comprehensive overview of AUT qualifications, please refer to the Academic Calendar.

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