Pacific Journalism Review

Media and cultural diversity

The Pacific Journalism Review, founded at the University of Papua New Guinea in 1994, is a peer-reviewed journal covering media issues and communication in the South Pacific, Asia-Pacific, Australia and New Zealand. It is now published by the Pacific Media Centre, AUT University, and has links with the Australian Centre for Independent Journalism and the University of the South Pacific.

Call for papers for the next edition:


Pacific Journalism Review Special Edition
Pacific Journalism Review Special Edition

While one objective is research into Pacific journalism theory and practice, the journal is also expanding its interest into new areas of research and inquiry that reflect the broader impact of contemporary media practice and education.

A particular focus will be on the cultural politics of the media, including the following issues – new media and social movements, indigenous cultures in the age of globalisation, the politics of tourism and development, the role of the media and the formation of national identity and the cultural influence of New Zealand as a branch of the global economy within the Pacific region. It also has a special interest in environmental and development studies in the media and communication – and vernacular media in the region.

Main sections:

  • Research: Academic research and analysis papers (6000 words)
  • Frontline: Reflective and investigative journalism research and methodology (up to 6000 words)
  • Commentary: Industry insights, developments and practice (1500-3000 words)
  • Reviews: Books, online developments, multimedia, video (500-1000 words)
    Reviews editor: Dr Philip Cass Noted Reviews: 350 words
  • Forum: Letters, brief commentaries (up to 800 words)
  • Content and inquiries:

Pacific Journalism Review EditionsPacific Journalism Review books

PJR subscriptions online at AUT Shop

Back copies online at AUT Shop

PJR website

PJR Informit fulltext database

Pacific Journalism Review Latest RSS Feed:

Review: Searching for the truth of book-length journalism


Australian journalism academic and practitioner Matthew Ricketson’s new book opens with two quotes: one from South African writer Nadine Gordimer on the enduring presence of ‘beauty’ in the quest for truth; the other from US compara...


Being both: Gender and indigeneity in two Pacific documentary films


Transgender is a term originating from a particularly Western discourse of restrictive gender identity that struggles to account for diverse gender identities. Several non-Western cultures, however, especially indigenous cultures, have quite differen...


PJR 22(1) May 2016 Call for Papers


>>> Browse the PDF file>>> Submissions...


Cap Bocage: Tracing the militant voice of environmental protest in New Caledonia


This article is an attempt to document some of the filmmaking processes and highlight some of the specific factors that determined the final form of the film Cap Bocage. I see this as an opportunity to outline more personal reflections on process. Th...


If it bleeds, it leads? Changing death coverage in The New Zealand Herald


Death has become more prominent in the news in the past four decades. Articles about a murder or accident, which in the past may have featured on page five or seven of daily newspapers, now often take up all of the front page of The New Zealand Heral...



Managing Editor David Robie
Pacific Journalism Review
D-63 School of Communication Studies
Faculty of Design and Creative Technologies
AUT University

Private Bag 92006
Auckland 1142
New Zealand

Level 10,
WG Precinct, Gate 4,
Governor Fitzroy Place

Fax: (649) 921 9987

Last updated: 21-Oct-2015 11.39am

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