Neurological Rehabilitation

Dr Denise TaylorDr Denise Taylor, PhD, MSc, Grad Dip Phys

AUT University, Private Bag 92006, Auckland, N.Z.
Office: +64-9-9219680
Fax: +64-9-92199620
Email: denise.taylor@aut.ac.nz

Overview | Current Research Themes | Active Research Projects | Recent Publications | Commissioned Publications |
Peer Reviewed Publications | Invited Speaker | Poster Presentations | Contacts

OVERVIEW

The Neurological Rehabilitation Team (NR Team) is one of the research groups making up the Health & Rehabilitation Research Centre at AUT University. The team is lead by Dr Denise Taylor, Senior Lecturer Neurological Physiotherapy.

The team's research focuses on: studying the effectiveness of rehabilitation interventions aimed at improving outcomes for older adults transitioning to frailty and people with chronic neurological conditions; assessing the value of outcome measures used in people with neurological conditions; investigating the underlying physiological and neural control mechanisms associated with impairments and disabilities in order to develop novel intervention strategies that are specific and focussed. As a team we also work closely with the Person Centred Rehabilitation team led by Dr Kathryn McPherson. We use a variety of research methodologies and welcome collaboration with others interested in these areas.

We have links with a variety of health providers and funders which helps us to maintain a strong clinical focus and operating with these links we aim to implement high level evidence-based practice.

This information is intended to give a brief introduction to our team's work. If you would like more information about our team or our work, please contact us.

CURRENT RESEARCH THEMES

  • Understand complex movement control.
  • Recovery of the arm and hand after a stroke.
  • Outcome measures in neurological rehabilitation.
  • Falls prevention interventions in older adults.
  • Barriers and facilitators to physical activity (with the PCR team).
  • People living with neurological dysfunction.

Our Aims

  • To identify and test measures that are used when assessing people with movement disorders.
  • To evaluate interventions for people with neurological conditions and older adults who have a high risk of injury from falls.
  • To understand the mechanisms controlling complex functional movements and identify problems in people with neurological conditions.
  • To develop and test novel interventions based on research on the neural control of complex movements

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ACTIVE RESEARCH PROJECTS

An evaluation of the ACC’s Tai Chi Programme for the elderly.
Denise Taylor, Leigh Hale, Kathryn McPherson, Debra Waters, Noela Wilson, Philip Schluter, Hamish McCracken.
Funding: ACC
This is a large randomised controlled trial investigating the effectiveness of a 20 week Tai Chi programme compared to a flexibility programme in reducing falls in people over the age of 65 years who have a falls risk. Recruitment of participants is near completion . We are currently undertaking our first follow up assessments at 6 month post intervention.
Contact: Denise Taylor or Liz Binns denise.taylor@aut.ac.nz, liz.binns@aut.ac.nz

Does Tai Chi improve strength and balance in people with Multiple Sclerosis.
Liz Binns, Denise Taylor, Kathryn McPherson, Nicola Kayes.
Funding: AUT Contestable Grant
Tai Chi has been used in older adults at risk of falling and the evidence that in this population that Tai Chi improves lower limb strength and balance. We are working with the Multiple Sclerosis Society in Auckland and the North Shore to investigate the effect of a 20 week Tai Chi programme on strength and balance in people with Multiple Sclerosis. We are starting recruitment for this trial later this year.
Contact: Liz Binns or Denise Taylor liz.binns@aut.ac.nz, denise.taylor@aut.ac.nz

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EMG-triggered functional electrical stimulation for upper limb movement following stroke.
Denise Taylor, Lynne Taylor, Gwyn Lewis, Juliet Rosie.
Funding: New Zealand Society of Physiotherapy.
This project is investigating two different approaches to an electrical muscle stimulation protocol for improving upper limb function in people with stroke. Cortical activity is assessed by measuring the evoked EMG response to transcranical stimulation before and after the application of the muscle stimulation. Measurement processes have been tested and data collection is now underway.
Contact: Denise Taylor denise.taylor@aut.ac.nz or lynne.taylor@aut.ac.nz

Pre-training and the training-related rate of change in the functional ability of older adults: possible relations to the ACE gene.
Justin Keogh, Denise Taylor, Andrew Kilding.
Funding: AUT.
Community-based group exercise, like the AUT-based Never Too Old (N2O) program are becoming popular world-wide. The N2O is now available through Auckland-based YMCA gyms. While N2O participants have reported improvements in their physical function and well-being, little empirical data has been collected. Thus, the purpose of this study is to determine how effective the N2O is in improving the physical function of older adults, and how this may be affected by their age, gender, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) genotype and training frequency. This data has benefits to the health of older adults, financial and promotional benefits for AUT and career opportunities for AUT graduates. We are currently data collecting on this project.
Contact: Denise Taylor denise.taylor@aut.ac.nz

Sit-to-stand as home exercise for mobility limited adults over 80 years of age - GrandStand System may keep you standing?
A device that is used to count the number of sit-to-stand movements made by a person has been the focus of this randomised controlled study in which we have evaluated the effectiveness of the GrandStand System to improve physical performance in people at high risk of falling. We have recently completed this trial and have submitted it for publication.
Contact: Juliet Rosie or Denise Taylor juliet.rosie@aut.ac.nz, denise.taylor@aut.ac.nz

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The high level mobility assessment tool (HiMat): re- test reliability in young healthy adults and the development of a normative database.
Juliet Rosie, Denise Taylor, Gavin Williams, Anjana Narsai.
Funding: AUT
The HiMat is a high level mobility assessment tool used in young adults with traumatic brain injury. We are working with Gavin Williams (Melbourne, Australia) to test the reliability of the instrument and to develop a normative database on which interpretation of results from people with traumatic brain injury can be based. We have completed the data collection for this study and are currently analysing the results.

The coordination and training of nurses to deliver the Otago Exercise Programme.
Denise Taylor, Liz Binns.
Funding: Ministry of Health.
The Otago Exercise Programme (OEP) is a home based programme aimed at reducing falls in community dwelling older adults. The OEP has been shown to be effective in reducing falls by about a third in older adults. We have developed a web-based training package for physiotherapists to complete. On completion they can access all the training resources necessary to train and supervise nurses to deliver the OEP.
Contact: Denise Taylor or Liz Binns denise.taylor@aut.ac.nz, liz.binns@aut.ac.nz

The coordination of eye, head and segmental body movements during voluntary step turning tasks.
Denise Taylor, Neil Shepard, Ann Ashburn, Caroline Juniot, Bobbi-Jo Wilson.
Funding: HRRC.
This project is a collaborative project with groups from the USA and UK. We are investigating the control of complex multisegmental movements, such as visually guided step turning in order to understand complex function in real life. It is a laboratory based study using 3-D motion analysis. We have completed the data collection for the first phase of this project and are currently analysing the data and planning the next phase of the project.
Contact: Denise Taylor denise.taylor@aut.ac.nz

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Central neuromuscular fatigue following stroke.
Nada Signal, Denise Taylor, Peter McNair.
Funding: HRRC.
The aim of this study was to investigate whether people with stroke developed a proportionally greater amount of neuromuscular fatigue when compared to normal subjects, and to elucidate the primary site of neuromuscular fatigue development in these people. This project has recently been completed and we are currently writing it up for publication.
Contact: Denise Taylor or Nada Signal denise.taylor@aut.ac.nz, nada.signal@aut.ac.nz

The Neurological Rehabilitation Team contributions to other current funded projects

Barriers and facilitators to activity in people with chronic neurological conditions - Multiple sclerosis & Stroke studies.
McPherson lead at AUT, Funding: HRC

Validity and reliability of accelerometers in quantifying physical activity in people with chronic neurological conditions.
Kayes lead, AUT, Funding: HRC & AUT

The Physical Activity and Disability Survey (PADS): reliability, validity and acceptability in people with multiple sclerosis.
Kayes lead, AUT, Funding: AUT

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RECENT PUBLICATIONS/PRESENTATIONS

Peer reviewed publications:

Armstrong, B., McNair, P., & Taylor, D. (2007). Head and Neck Position Sense. Sports Medicine, (In Press).

Kayes, N.M., McPherson, K.M., Taylor, D., et al. (2007). The Physical Activity and Disability Survey (PADS): reliability, validity and acceptability in people with multiple sclerosis. Clinical Rehabilitation (In Press).

Rosie, J., Taylor, D., (2007). Sit-to-stand as home exercise for mobility limited adults over 80 years of age - GrandStand System may keep you standing? Age & Ageing, (In Press).

Taylor, D., & Binns, E. E. (2007). An evaluation of the Otago Exercise Programme, are we putting research in practice? New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy, (In Press).

Wilson, B. K., Kayes, N. M., McPherson, K. M., Taylor, D., & Kolt, G. (2006). Is the Physical Activity Disability Survey (PADS) modified version a valid and reliable measure for use in people with multiple sclerosis (MS)? New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy, 34(2), 113-114.

Taylor, D., Stretton, C., M. , Mudge, S., & Garrett, N. (2006). Does clinic-measured gait speed differ from gait speed measured in the community in people with stroke? Clinical Rehabilitation, 20(5), 438.

Binns, E. (2006). Falls prevention in the practice. Practice Nurse, 6(3); 20-21.

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COMMISSIONED PUBLICATIONS

Taylor, D., & Binns, E. E. (January 2006). Co-ordination and training of practice nurses to deliver the Otago Exercise Programme to older persons. (A report provided to the Ministry of Health): Auckland, AUT University.

Taylor, D., & Binns, E. E. (July 2006). Co-ordination and training of practice nurses to deliver the Otago Exercise Programme to older persons. (A report provided to the Ministry of Health): Auckland, AUT University.

Taylor, D., & Binns, E. E. (July 2006). Otago Exercise Programme on nurse delivered and physiotherapist delivered programmes in New Zealand. (A report commissioned by the Accident Compensation Corporation New Zealand): Auckland, AUT University.

Taylor, D., & Binns, E. E. (December 2006). Otago Exercise Programme on nurse delivered and physiotherapist delivered programmes in New Zealand. (A report commissioned by the Accident Compensation Corporation New Zealand). Auckland: AUT University.

INVITED SPEAKER

Taylor, D. (2006). Getting a grip on grasp needs more than a glance. New Zealand Society of Physiotherapy conference, Auckland 19 – 21 May.

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ORAL PRESENTATIONS

Peer reviewed presentations:

Taylor, D, Juniot, C, Wilson, B-J, Shepard, N., Ashburn, A. (2007) Coordination of eye and head movements during turning. New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists Neurology Special Interest Group Neurosymposium, Nelson 11 May.

Juniot, C, Taylor, D, Wilson, B-J, Shepard, N., Ashburn, A. (2007) Visually guided step turns: effect of age on centre of pressure displacement and muscle activity prior to onset of movement. New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists Neurology Special Interest Group Neurosymposium, Nelson 11 May.

Clague, N., Taylor, D., (2007) The role of the cerebellum in procedural learning – are there implications for physiotherapists’ clinical practice? New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists Neurology Special Interest Group Neurosymposium, Nelson 11 May.

Charlesworth, P., Johnston, S., Kayes, N., McPherson, K., Schluter, P., Taylor D., Mawston, G., (2007) Testing the validity and reliability of accelerometers in quantifying physical activity in people after stroke. New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists Neurology Special Interest Group Neurosymposium, Nelson 11 May.

Johnston, S., Charlesworth, P., Kayes, N., McPherson, K., Taylor D., Cummins, C., Fadyl J., Leete, M. (2007) Facilitators and barriers to physical activity for people with stroke: a qualitative exploration. New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists Neurology Special Interest Group Neurosymposium, Nelson 11 May.

Binns, E. Taylor, D., Smith, C., Holt, K. (2006) Community based falls prevention in West Auckland. The Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners Conference, Auckland.

Binns, EE, D’Brass, JEM, Taylor, D. The effectiveness, challenges and solutions of delivering the Otago Exercise Programme in New Zealand. Australian Falls Prevention Conference, Brisbane (2006).

Taylor, D., Stretton, C., Mudge, S., Garrett, N. (2007). The 10m walk test; does it reflect gait speed in the community? National Institute of Rehabilitation Research and New Zealand Rehabilitation Association Conference, Rotorua 16 – 18 February.

Kayes, N.M., McPherson, K.M, Taylor, D., Schluter, P.J., & Kolt, G.S. (2007). The Physical Activity Disability Survey (PADS): reliability, validity and utility in people with Multiple Sclerosis. National Institute of Rehabilitation Research and New Zealand Rehabilitation Association Conference, Rotorua 16 – 18 February.

Binns, E.E., Taylor, D., (2006). Falls prevention in New Zealand. New Zealand Society of Physiotherapy conference, Auckland 19 – 21 May.

Wilson, B.J., Kayes, N.M., McPherson, K.M., Taylor, D., & Kolt, G. (2006). The physical activity and disability survey (PADS): A reliability and validity study in people with Multiple Sclerosis. New Zealand Society of Physiotherapy conference, Auckland 19 – 21 May.

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Poster Presentations:

Narsai, A., Rosie, J., Taylor, D. (2007) The high level mobility assessment tool (HiMat): re- test reliability in young healthy adults. New Zealand Society of Physiotherapists Neurology Special Interest Group Neurosymposium, Nelson 11 May.

CONTACTS

RESEARCH LEADER:
Denise Taylor, Senior Lecturer (09) 921 9680 denise.taylor@aut.ac.nz

CORE TEAM:
Liz Binns, Research Officer (09) 9219999 liz.binns@aut.ac.nz
Juliet Rosie, Research Officer (09) 9219999 juliet.rosie@aut.ac.nz
Bobbie-Jo Wilson, Research Assistant (09) 9219999 bobbie-jo.wilson@aut.ac.nz
Nada Signal, Research Officer (09) 921 9999 nada.signal@aut.ac.nz

We have many links with other individuals and organizations. Our national and international links are available on request .

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Last updated: 10-Jun-2016 12.09pm

The information on this page was correct at time of publication. For a comprehensive overview of AUT qualifications, please refer to the Academic Calendar.