Professor Jane Gilbert

Professor Jane Gilbert.

Professor

Phone: +64 9 921 9999 ext 8159

Email: Jane.Gilbert@aut.ac.nz

Physical Address:

Room AR215, School of Education, AUT Akoranga Campus, 90 Akoranga Dr,
Northcote Auckland 0627.



Postal Address:

School of Education, AUT University,
Private Bag 92006 Auckland 1142.



Qualifications:

  • Doctor of Philosophy (Science Education, University of Waikato)
  • Master of Arts with Distinction (Applied Linguistics, Victoria University of Wellington)
  • Diploma of Teaching English as a Second Language, (Victoria University of Wellington)
  • Diploma in Teaching (Auckland College of Education)
  • Bachelor of Arts (Zoology & Anthropology, University of Auckland).

Memberships and Affiliations:

  • New Zealand Association for Research in Education (NZARE)

Biography:

Jane was appointed Professor of Education at AUT University in 2013. She was previously Chief Researcher at the New Zealand Council for Educational Research (NZCER).


Before that she was a Senior Lecturer in Education at Victoria University of Wellington, a Lecturer in Education at the University of Waikato, and, many years ago, she was a secondary school teacher of biology and science.

Teaching Areas:

Educational Futures

2016 MEd courses:

  • EDUC824 Educational Futures — Part One: The Theory
  • EDUC825 Educational Futures — Part Two: The Practice.

Supervision

PhD

  • Vincent Minjares: Tactical learning experiences in New Zealand Secondary School Boys' Basketball 
  • Hazel Redpath: At proposal stage.

MEd

  • Leanne Lamb: Mapping the conceptual landscapes of school-university partnerships: A critical discourse analysis 
  • Danielle Myburgh: Using MOOCs and complexity thinking to disrupt current debates on educational futures.
  • Dawn Sullivan: Teachers' transformational learning? A case study of teachers' views of knowledge as they participate in a collaborative think tank. 
  • Gina Potter: Present day utopias? Listening to the voices of alternative possibilities in educational futures scenarios. 
  • Latisha Kelly: Probing for change in a complex education system.

Completed PhD theses

  • Tasker, G. (2001). Students' experiences in an HIV-AIDS sexuality education programme: What they learned and the implications for teaching and learning in health education. Victoria University of Wellington PhD.
  • Watson, S. (1999). Gender and choice: Girls, single-sex schooling, and school choice. Victoria University of Wellington PhD.
  • Walshaw, M. (1999). Paradox, partiality and promise: A politics for girls in school mathematics. Massey University PhD.

Completed MA/MEd theses

  • Spiller, L. (2012) Teachers' Misunderstandings that Affect the Learning of Their Pasifika Students. Unpublished MEd thesis, Victoria University of Wellington.
  • Robertson, S. (2012). Stories of Young Migrants' Cross-Cultural Educational Transitions. Unpublished MA thesis, Victoria University of Wellington.
  • Wakelin, S. (2001). 'Liberatory' education: Some problems and possibilities. Unpublished Master of Arts thesis, Victoria University of Wellington.
  • Gendall, L. (2001). Theory to practice in mathematics education: Student teachers'planning of a classroom mathematics programme for primary school children. Unpublished Master of Education thesis, Victoria University of Wellington.
  • Meyers, T. (2000). Why are science textbooks so difficult to read? Unpublished Master of Education thesis, Victoria University of Wellington.
  • Hipkins, R. (1998). Rethinking the nature of science knowledge construction: A fruitful focus for pre-service primary teacher education. Unpublished Master of Education thesis, Victoria University of Wellington.

Research Summary:

My early-career academic work was in science education and equity issues in education. I have worked on a range of different questions in these areas for nearly 30 years. I also have a background in the sociology and philosophy of education, and language issues in education.


However, over the last fifteen years or so, I have mainly worked in the area of educational futures, looking in particular at the implications for education of Knowledge/Network Age developments.

My book Catching the Knowledge Wave? – The Knowledge Society and the future of education was published in 2005.


In 2015 I completed a three-year TLRI-funded research project following a group of teachers as they participated in PLD designed to foster "future-oriented" thinking. The findings from this project have led me into complexity/systems thinking, and I am now interested in unpacking the way concepts like collaboration, partnership, interaction and innovation are being used in educational contexts.

Current Research Projects:

I am currently Principal Investigator on a research project called: Taking the Temperature: Assessing the "future-readiness" of New Zealand teachers. This is a large-scale survey designed to assess the extent New Zealand teachers are prepared for a future-oriented education system

I am the Director of Edge Work, which is a virtual network of people interested in educational futures thinking, based at AUT University. It carries out applied research, convenes seminars and conferences, and offers bespoke professional learning for schools.

Publications:

Books

  • Bolstad, R. & Gilbert, J. (2008). Disciplining and drafting, or 21st century learning? Rethinking the New Zealand senior school curriculum for the future. Wellington: NZCER Press.
  • Bolstad, R. with J. Gilbert (2006). Zooming in on learning in the digital age: A literature review. Wellington: NZCER Press.
  • Gilbert, J. (2005). Catching the Knowledge Wave? The Knowledge Society and the future of education in New Zealand. Wellington: NZCER Press.

Papers in refereed journals

  • Gilbert, J. (2016). Transforming  Science Education for the Anthropocene—Is It Possible? Research  in Science Education 46(2),  pp.187-201 DOI 10.1007/s11165-015-9498-2
  • Gilbert. J. (2013). What should initial teacher education programmes for 2022 look like and why? Waikato Journal of Education Te Hautaka Mātauranga o Waikato. 18(1), pp.105–116.
  • Gilbert, J. (2012). Science 2.0 and school science. New Zealand Science Teacher 131, pp.5-9.
  • Gilbert, J. (2011). School science is like wrestling with an octopus. New Zealand Science Teacher 126, pp.29-31.
  • Gilbert, J. & Calvert, S. (2011). Connectedness — what is it? Psychology Aotearoa, 3(2), pp.99-103.
  • Gilbert, J. (2010). Equity and difference: Schooling and social democracy in the 21st century? Critical Literacy: theories and practices 4(1) www.criticalliteracyjournal.org.
  • Gilbert, J. (2007). Knowledge, the disciplines, and learning in the digital age. Education Research Policy and Practice, 6(2), pp.115–122.
  • Gilbert, J. (2007). Catching the Knowledge Wave? The "knowledge society" and the future of public education. Education Canada, 47(3), pp.4-8.
  • Gilbert, J. (2003). Catching the Knowledge Wave? The "knowledge society" — what does it mean for education? Set — Research Information for Teachers, 3, pp.31–32.
  • Gilbert, J. & Calvert, S. (2003). Challenging accepted wisdom: Looking at the gender and science question through a different lens. International Journal of Science Education, 25(7), pp.861–878.
  • Gilbert, J. & Cameron, M. (2002). When two cultures collide: Similarities and differences between tertiary teachers in two institutional contexts. New Zealand Journal of Educational Studies/Te Hautaka Matai Mātauranga o Aotearoa, 37(1), pp.87–91.
  • Gilbert, J. (2001). Science and its 'other': Looking underneath 'woman' and 'science' for new directions in research on gender and science education. Gender and Education, 13(3), pp.291–305.
  • Gilbert, J. (2001). "It's science, Jim, but not as we know it": Re-thinking an ‘old’ discipline for the Knowledge Society. Science and Mathematics Education Papers 2001, pp.174–190.
  • Gilbert, J. (1999). "It's life, Jim, but not as we know it": The trouble with girls' achievement in traditionally 'masculine' subjects at school. Women's Studies Journal, 15(2), pp.9–27.
  • Gilbert, J. & Calvert, S. (1999). Troubling accepted wisdom: Looking at the gender and science question through a different lens. Science and Mathematics Education Papers 1999, pp. 78-117.
  • Gilbert, J. (1998). Gender equity statements in the New Zealand National Curriculum documents: Their genealogy and likely effects. New Zealand Annual Review of Education/Te Arotake ā Tau o te Ao o te Mātauranga i Aotearoa, 8, pp.97–117.
  • Gilbert, J. (1997). Looking underneath the categories 'science' and 'gender' for new directions in research on gender issues in science education. Science and Mathematics Education Papers 1997, pp.61–85.
  • English, C., Gilbert, J. & Hipkins, R. (1997). 'Keeping it complex': a response to "Making Sense of Learning Science in New Zealand", by Lydia Austin. New Zealand Science Teacher 84, pp. 3-7.
  • Gilbert, J. (1996). The sex education component of school science programmes as a 'micro-technology' of power. Women's Studies Journal, 12(2), pp.37–57.
  • Gilbert, J. (1994). The construction and reconstruction of the concept of the 'reflective practitioner' in the discourses of teacher professional development. Invited paper for a special issue of the International Journal of Science Education, 16(5), pp.511–522.
  • Gilbert, J. (1994). The semiotics of human sex chromosomes. University of Waikato Women's Studies Occasional Paper No. 9. Hamilton: University of Waikato Department of Women's Studies.
  • Gilbert, J. (1992). Achieving equity in small group discussions. Working Papers on Language, Gender and Sexism, 2(2), pp. 55-74.
  • Gilbert, J. & McComish, J. (1990). Science learning, language, and feminist pedagogy. Science and Mathematics Education Papers 1990, pp. 32-59.
  • Gilbert, J. & Wilson, J. (1987). Need a choice. Future Times: The Journal of the New Zealand Futures Trust, pp. 6-7.

Book chapters

  • Gilbert, J. (2010). Are we there yet? Sixty years of educational sociology and equality in Aotearoa-New Zealand. In K. Stevens and J. Kidman (eds.), Looking back from the centre: A snapshot of contemporary New Zealand education. Wellington: Victoria University Press (pp.19-40).
  • Gilbert, J. & Bull, A. (2009). Educational implications for communities affected by transience and residential movement. In B. James (ed.), Findings from the Building Attachment in Communities Affected by Transience and Residential Mobility project. Wellington: Centre for Research, Evaluation and Social Assessment.
  • Gilbert, J. (2005). Catching the Knowledge Wave? 'Knowledge society' developments and the future of public education in New Zealand. In: J. Codd & K. Sullivan (Eds.), Education Policy Directions in Aotearoa/New Zealand: Looking for a Third Way? (pp. 53–70). Southbank, VIC: Thomson Dunmore Press.
  • Gilbert, J. & Calvert, S. (2005). Challenging accepted wisdom: Looking at the gender and science question through a different lens. In: J. K Gilbert (ed.) Science education: Major themes (Volume 1, Chapter 14, pp. 276-297). London: Taylor & Francis. [NB this paper is a re-published version of Gilbert & Calvert (2003) — see above]
  • Gilbert, J. (1995) Feminism and science education: A response to Michael Matthews' "Challenging New Zealand Science Education". In: B. Bell (ed.) Responses to: 'Challenging New Zealand Science Education'. (pp.64-88). Hamilton: University of Waikato Centre for Science, Mathematics and Technology Education Research.

Research reports and working papers

  • Gilbert, J. (2015). Leading in collaborative, complex education systems. Commissioned paper for  New Zealand Education Council — Matatū Aotearoa
  • Gilbert, J. and Bull, A., with Stevens, L. and Giroux, M. (2015). On the Edge: Shifting Teachers' Paradigms for the Future: Final Report to the Teaching and Learning Research Initiative (TLRI). Available at: tlri.org.nz/ pdf icon.
  • Gilbert, J. and Bull, A. (2013). Building a future-oriented science education system in New Zealand — how are we doing? Wellington: NZCER.
  • Bull, A. and Gilbert, J. (2013). Exploring teacher professional learning for future-oriented schooling. Working Paper 1 from the Back to the Future project. Wellington: NZCER.
  • Bolstad, R., Bull, A., Carson, S., Gilbert, J., MacIntyre, W. and Spiller, L. (2013). Strengthening engagements between schools and the science community: Final report. Report prepared for the Ministry of Education. (Available at nzcer.org.nz).
  • Bull, A. and Gilbert, J. (2012). Swimming out of our depth? Leading learning in 21st century schools. Wellington: NZCER. Available at nzcer.org.nz/research/publications.
  • Bolstad, R. and Gilbert, J. (with S. McDowall, A. Bull, S. Boyd and R. Hipkins (2012). Supporting future-oriented learning and teaching — a New Zealand perspective. Research report prepared for the Ministry of Education. Wellington: Ministry of Education. Available at educationcounts.govt.nz/publications. (73pp).
  • Bull, A., Gilbert, J., Barwick, H., Hipkins, R. and Baker, R. (2010). Inspired by Science – a paper commissioned by the Prime Minister’s Science Advisor. Wellington: New Zealand Council for Educational Research. [This paper informed the later report: Looking Ahead: Science Education for the Twenty-First Century: a report from the Prime Minister's Chief Science Advisor (known as the 'Gluckman Report'). April 2011. Available at pmcsa.org.nz.
  • Roberts, J., Gardiner, B., Gilbert, J., & Vaughan, K. (2008). Trading choices: young people's career decisions and gender segregation in the trades. Wellington: Ministry of Women's Affairs.
  • Gilbert, J. (2007). Personalising learning — Discussion Paper for the Minister of Education. Unpublished discussion paper for the Ministry of Education.
  • Bull, A. & Gilbert, J. (2007). Student movement and schools — what are the issues? Report prepared for the Centre for Research, Evaluation and Social Assessment. Wellington: NZCER.
  • Cooper, G., Gilbert, J., & Campbell, R. (2007). Te Kete o Aoraki: An evaluation. Report prepared for Te Runanga o Ngāi Tahu/Te Kete o Aoraki Reference Group. Wellington: NZCER.
  • Gilbert, J. & Bolstad, R. (2006). Personalising learning: a background paper by the New Zealand Council for Educational Research. Unpublished discussion paper for the Ministry of Education.
  • Bolstad, R., & Gilbert, J. (2006). Creating digital age learners through school ICT projects: What can the Tech Angels project teach us? Wellington: NZCER. Available at educationcounts.govt.nz/creating_digital_age_learners.
  • Bolstad, R., & Gilbert, J. (2006). The Tech Angels project as ICT initiative: A discussion paper. Unpublished report for the Ministry of Education.
  • Bolstad, R. & Gilbert, J. (2006) The Tech Angels project: Inviting teachers into the world of digital learning. Available at: educationcounts.edcentre.govt.nz/research/ict-tech-angels.html.
  • Bolstad, R., Gilbert, J. & Hipkins, R. with R. Baker (2006). Tech Angels at Wellington Girls' College. A report on a research project for the Ministry of Education and Wellington Girls’ College (unpublished).
  • Bolstad, R., Gilbert, J., Vaughan, K., Darr, C., & Cooper, G. (2006). Zooming in on learning in the digital age (ZILDA): Report No 1: Zooming in on "digital age" learners. Wellington: NZCER.
  • Gilbert, J. (2005). Educational issues for communities affected by transience and residential mobility: Report on Phase One (2003–04). Wellington: NZCER.
  • Goven, J., Cram, F., & Gilbert, J. (2004). Eliciting complementary expertise on genetic testing in Aotearoa New Zealand: Working Paper (Research Report No 4) for the Constructive Conversations Kōrero Whakaaetanga project. Available from conversations.canterbury.ac.nz/reportspapers.
  • Gilbert, J. (2001). Engaging women and girls in science: Re-configuring science, science education and gender for the Knowledge Age. Paper prepared for the Ministry of Research, Science and Technology. Available from morst.govt.nz.

Theses

  • PhD — Gilbert, J. (1997). Thinking 'Other'-Wise: Re-thinking the problem of girls and science education in the postmodern. University of Waikato (Centre for Science and Mathematics Education Research).
  • MA — Gilbert, J. (1990). Secondary school students talking about science: Language functions, gender, and interaction in small group discussions. Victoria University of Wellington (English Language Institute/School of Language and Applied Linguistics).

Last updated: 13-Oct-2016 9.59am

The information on this page was correct at time of publication. For a comprehensive overview of AUT qualifications, please refer to the Academic Calendar.