Dr Ailsa Haxell

Head of School - Interprofessional Health Studies

Phone: +64 9 921 9999 ext 7105

Email: ailsa.haxell@aut.ac.nz

Physical Address:
North Shore Campus
90 Akoranga Drive
Northcote
North Shore City

Postal Address:
Mail No A-5
Private Bag 92006
Auckland 1142
New Zealand

Qualifications:

PhD (Deakin University)
PGCert Education (Endorsed in management) (Massey University)
MHSc (Hons) (University of Auckland)
BA (Double major: Education and Psychology) (University of Auckland)
Certificate in Adult and Tertiary Teaching
Diploma in Nursing (ATI)

Memberships and Affiliations:

•    Executive Management member for Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences
•    Academic Board for Faculty of Health and Environmental sciences
•    HERDSA (Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia)
•    TEU (Tertiary Education Union)
•    Health Promotion Forum of New Zealand
•    Youthline (New Zealand)

Biography:

Over the last 10 years, Ailsa’s teaching and research interests have focused on the socio-technical-political context of change. Her particular interest is in areas of learning, teaching and research that is informed by understandings of socio-materiality. She completed a PhD thesis titled ‘Enactments of change; becoming textually active at Youthline (NZ)'. Ailsa has presented her research nationally and internationally.

Ailsa has had a variety of leadership roles within the Faculty, including representation on Boards of Studies, Faculty Boards, Examination Boards as well as involvement as a Programme Leader, and latterly as Head of School.  


Teaching Areas:

Communications across the lifespan
Health and the environment (media and technology)
Learning and assessment in health professional education
Clinical teaching and learning
Health professional education (special project)

Research Areas:

My most recent research involves the study of change and the use of emergent technologies. This has included studying the integration of technologically mediated communications within counselling and clinical settings.

Current research includes health practitioner error where communication skills have been implicated.

I am involved in the work of two research centres:

Centre for ehealth AUT University

National Centre for Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice (NCIECP)

 

Publications:

This is a list of some recent publications, click here for a more complete list as well as publication metrics.

Books

Shaw, S., Haxell, A., & Weblemoe, T. (Eds.). (2012). Communication across the lifespan. Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.
Chapters

Le Geyt, G., Mercier, J., Hartdegen, M., Davies, A., & Haxell, A. (2012). Teens. In S. Shaw, Haxell, A., & Weblemoe, T. (Ed.), Communication across the lifespan (pp. 60-71). Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.

Mpofu, C., & Haxell, A. (2012). Early Adulthood. In S. Shaw, Haxell, A., & Weblemoe, T. (Ed.), Communication across the lifespan (pp. 72-79). Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.

Haxell, A. (2012). The electronic message. In S. Shaw, A. Haxell, & T. Weblemoe (Eds.), Communication across the lifespan (pp. 269-282). Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.

Haxell, A. (2012). Media and technology. In S. Shaw, L. White, & B. Deed (Eds.), Health and the environment in Aotearoa/ New Zealand (pp.176-193). Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.

Le Geyt, G., Mercier, J., Hartdegen, M., Davies, A., & Haxell, A. (2012). Teens. In S. Shaw, Haxell, A., & Weblemoe, T. (Ed.), Communication across the lifespan (pp. 60-71). Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.

Mpofu, C., & Haxell, A. (2012). Early Adulthood. In S. Shaw, Haxell, A., & Weblemoe, T. (Ed.), Communication across the lifespan (pp. 72-79). Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.

Shaw, S., Haxell, A., & Weblemoe, T. (2012). Introducing communication and development. In S. Shaw, Haxell, A., & Weblemoe, T. (Ed.), Communication across the lifespan (pp. 3-8). Melbourne, Australia: Oxford University Press.

Journal articles

Haxell, A. (2014). On becoming textually active at Youthline, New Zealand. British Journal of Guidance and Counselling. doi:10.1080/03069885.2014.922163

Reports

Haxell, M., & Haxell, A. (2011). Youthline retention survey. Auckland: Youthline Trust.

Tanielu, R., McBride, P., Haxell, A., & Geyt, G. L. (2010). Therapeutic texting. Understanding text messaging as an e-therapy. Auckland, NZ: Counties Manakau District Health Board.

Awards:

Deakin University Contestable Post-Doctoral Writing Scholarship (2013)
Youthline Extraordinary Service Award (2013)
Cathay Pacific Community Travel Grant (2010)
Vice-Chancellor Study Award (2009)
Exceptional Adult Educator Award, UNESCO/TEC/ACE (2008)
AUT Contestable Grants: Resources Enhancing Learning & Teaching, 2003, 2004 & 2005; Learning and Teaching Development Fund 2014.

Last updated: 12-Feb-2015 2.30pm

The information on this page was correct at time of publication. For a comprehensive overview of AUT qualifications, please refer to the Academic Calendar.