Dr Denise Taylor

Denise Taylor

Professor School of Clinical Sciences

Phone: 09 921 9680

Email: denise.taylor@aut.ac.nz

Postal Address:
Room AA115B, North Shore Campus
Faculty of Health and Environmental Science
Private Bag 92006
Auckland 1142

Qualifications:

  • 2010, Postgraduate Certificate, Health Economics, University of Aberdeen
  • 2004, PhD, Motor Control, University of Otago
  • 1991, MSc, Rehabilitation, Southampton University
  • 1986, Graduate Diploma, Physiotherapy, Coventry University 

Memberships and Affiliations:

  • 2011-ongoing. Member of the Department of Physiotherapy Leadership Group
  •  2011 Member of the Organising Committee of the New Zealand Applied Neuroscience Conference.
  • 2010-ongoing, member of the ARCOS IV (population based stroke study) Steering Committee
  • 2010-present. Member of the International Health Economics Association
  • 2010, Member of the Organizing Committee of the inaugural New Zealand Stroke & Applied Neurosciences Conference.
  • 2000-present, Expert Advisor in neurological physiotherapy to the Health & Disability Commissioner
  • 2005-ongoing: Team leader Neurological Physiotherapy (Teaching and Research).
  • 2008-2010, International Editorial Board New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy
  • 2007-present, member of the Executive Committee of the Health & Rehabilitation Research Institute, AUT
  • 2003-2007, Committee member of the New Zealand Society of Physiotherapy Neurology special interest group (National interest group)
  • 2006-present, Member of the Scientific Committee of the New Zealand Society of Physiotherapy Neurosymposium.
  • 2007, Member of the organizing committee of the New Zealand Society of Physiotherapy Biennial Conference
  • 2005-2006, Postgraduate Academic Advisor, Faculty of Health & Environmental Sciences, AUT

Teaching Areas:

Teaching responsibility: BHSc (Physiotherapy) Undergraduate

  •   Managing Neuromuscular Disorders
  •   Neurological Physiotherapy
  •   Y4 Research project
  •   Biophysics (paper leader)
  •   Kinesiology II
  •   Integrated Therapeutics


Teaching responsibility: MHSc (Physiotherapy)

  • Motor Control in Rehabilitation (Previously Neurological Rehabilitation A) (paper leader & lecturer)
  • Neurological Rehabilitation (Previously Neurological Rehabilitation B (lecturer & paper leader until 2009)
  • Concepts of Rehabilitation (Previously Theoretical Concepts in Neurological Rehabilitation) (lecturer & paper leader until 2008)
  • Stroke Management (lecturer)
  • Therapeutic Exercise Science (guest lecturer)

Research Areas:

  • Neurological rehabilitation
  • Health of older adults

Research Summary:

My professional specialty is in neurological rehabilitation, I have taught neurological rehabilitation on undergraduate and postgraduate programmes since 1996. I have expertise in 3 dimensional motion analysis and was key in attracting the ADHB and STARSHIP hospital gait analysis service to AUT. I have good links with the profession which assists in disseminating our research findings and effecting a change in practice.

 

Current research projects

My research interests are within the area of neurological rehabilitation and health of older adults. Recently I have been involved in research and implementation work based on ideas of population health to improve the health of large populations of people rather than focusing on change at an individual level (publications currently in review). This is a different approach in physiotherapy, which mainly focuses on treatment at an individual level. As part of this work I have become increasingly aware of the importance of economic evaluations alongside clinical trials. In our recently completed multi-site randomised controlled trial of falls prevention in older adults we conducted an economic evaluation. Working alongside an economist on this trial sparked my interest and I went on to study health economics in 2009-10, through the University of Aberdeen and have attended a course on Advanced Methods of Cost-Effectiveness Analysis, 21-23 February 2011, run by the Health Economics Research Centre, University of Oxford. In April 2012 I attended a workshop on “Discrete Choice Experiments”, run by the Health Economics Research Centre, Aberdeen. This is a relatively new method of health economic evaluation that could be particularly pertinent for rehabilitation research.

 

Publications:

  • Taylor, D. (2014) Physical activity is medicine for older adults, Postgraduate Medical Journal 90(1059): 26-32
  • Lewis G., Signal, N., Taylor D., (2014) Reliability of lower limb motor evoked potentials in stroke and healthy populations: How many responses are needed? Clinical Neurophysiology 125(4): 748-754
  • Keogh, J., Rice, J., Taylor, D., Kilding, A. (2014) Objective benefits, participant perceptions and retention rates of a New Zealand community-based, older-adult exercise programme. Journal of Primary Health Care 6(2): 114-122
  • Stretton, C., Mudge, S., Kayes, N.M., Taylor, D., McPherson, K.M. (2013) Activity coaching to improve walking is liked by rehabilitation patients but physiotherapists have concerns: a qualitative study. Journal of Physiotherapy 59(3):199-206
  • Saywell, N., Vandal, A.C., Brown, P., Hanger, H.C., Hale, L., Mudge, S., Stephan Milosavljevic, S., Valery Feigin, V., Taylor, D. (2012). Telerehabilitation to improve outcomes for people with stroke: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Trials 13(1): 233
  • Saywell, N., Taylor, D., Boocock, M. (2012). During step descent, older adults exhibit decreased knee range of motion and increased vastus lateralis muscle activity. Gait & Posture 36(3):490-4
  • Saywell , N., Vandal, A.C., Brown, P., Hanger, H., Hale, L., Mudge, S.,   Milosavljevic, S., Feigin, V., Taylor, D. (2012). Telerehabilitation to improve outcomes for people with stroke: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Trials  13, 233.
  • Saywell, N., Taylor, D,. Boocock, M., (2012) During step descent, older adults exhibit decreased knee range of motion and increased vastus lateralis muscle activity. Gait & Posture. IN PRESS.
  • Taylor, D., Hale, L., Schluter, P., Waters, D., Binns, L., McCracken, H., Wolf, S. (2012). The effectiveness of tai chi as a community based falls prevention intervention: a randomized controlled trial. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
  • Taylor, L., Lewis, G., & Taylor, D. (2012). Short-term effects of electrical stimulation and voluntary activity on corticomotor excitability in healthy individuals and people with stroke. Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology. IN PRESS
  • Wagenaar, R., Keogh, JW., Taylor, D., (2012). Development of a Clinical Multiple-Lunge test to predict falls in older adults. Archives of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, 93, 458-465.
  • Binns, E., & Taylor, D. (2011). The effect of the Otago Exercise Programme on strength and balance in community dwelling older women. New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy, 39(2), 63-68.
  • Kayes, N. M., McPherson, K. M., Schluter, P., Taylor, D., Leete, M., & Kolt, G. S. (2011). Exploring the facilitators and barriers to engagement in physical activity for people with multiple sclerosis. Disability & Rehabilitation, 33(12), 1043-1053.
  • Kayes, N. M., McPherson, K. M., Taylor, D., Schluter, P. J., & Kolt, G. S. (2011). Facilitators and barriers to engagement in physical activity for people with Multiple Sclerosis: A qualitative investigation. Disability & Rehabilitation, 33(8), 625-642.
  • Mudge, S., Taylor, D., Chang, O., & Wong, R. (2010). Test-retest reliability of the StepWatch activity monitor outputs in healthy adults. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 7(5), 671-676.
  • Taylor, D. (2011). Can Wii improve balance? New Zealand Journal of Physiotherapy, 39(3), 131-133.
  • Kayes, N. M., Schluter, P. J., McPherson, K. M., Leete, M., Mawston, G., & Taylor, D. (2009). Exploring actical accelerometers as an objective measure of physical activity in people with multiple sclerosis. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 90(4), 594-601.
  • Kayes, N. M., Schluter, P. J., McPherson, K. M., Taylor, D., & Kolt, G. S. (2009). The Physical Activity and Disability Survey Revised (PADS-R): An evaluation of a measure of physical activity in people with chronic neurological conditions. Clinical Rehabilitation, 23(6), 534-543.
  • Williams, G. P., Rosie, J., Denisenko, S., & Taylor, D. (2009). Normative values for the high-level mobility assessment tool (HiMAT). International Journal of Therapy & Rehabilitation, 16(7), 370-374.
  • Armstrong, B., McNair, P., & Taylor, D. (2008). Head and neck position sense. Sports Medicine, 38, 101-117.
  • Saywell, N., & Taylor, D. (2008). The role of the cerebellum in procedural learning- Are there implications for physiotherapists' clinical practice? Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, 24(5), 321-328.
  • Signal, N., Taylor, D., & McNair, P. J. (2008). Central and peripheral contributions to neuromuscular fatigue in people with stroke. Physical Therapy Reviews, 13(4), 249-257.

Awards:

  • Novice Presentation Award (to Juliet Rosie; primary supervisor), New Zealand Society of Physiotherapy Biennial Meeting, Auckland, 2010.
  • 2009, AUT Faculty of Health & Environmental Sciences Research Team Award (Team Leader)
  • 2004, Sir Reginald Savoury Travel Scholarship (travel for research collaboration)
  • 2004, New Zealand Society of Physiotherapy, FootScience Award for best paper published in the Journal

Last updated: 04-Oct-2016 12.31pm

The information on this page was correct at time of publication. For a comprehensive overview of AUT qualifications, please refer to the Academic Calendar.