Types of support for students with a disability

AUT offers different types of support for students who are Deaf or have a disability or impairment.

On this page:

Deaf and hearing impaired students

Some of our Student Hub Advisors have skills in New Zealand Sign Language (NZSL). AUT also has NZSL interpreters who can interpret for students.

Our Student Advisor Kyle Macfadyen supports Deaf and hearing impaired students. At your individual needs assessment interview, he will assess and arrange the help you need.

We understand you’ll have your own communication style preferences. Contact Kyle as soon as you are considering enrolling so we can make sure we have suitable resources for you. If you tell us when you enrol that you are Deaf or hearing impaired, we will contact you to tell you what to do next.

Email Kyle Macfadyen

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Types of support for Deaf and hearing impaired students

We can offer:

  • Sign language interpreting for students fluent in NZSL
  • Radio microphones and FM amplifying speakers
  • Digital recorders and SmartPens
  • Loop systems
  • Help and strategies for accessing lecture content and notes, eg notes online
  • Support to discuss your individual needs with lecturers and academic departments
  • Alternative arrangements for assessments and examinations, eg extra time, readers/writers
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Visually impaired students

You may need print materials in alternative formats. Contact your lecturers as soon as possible to find out what your course materials are so they transcribed in time for you to use them.

Our Adaptive Technology and Alternative Formats Coordinator will assess you during your needs assessment interview and develop your support plan. We can arrange training on our different software programmes if you need it.

Getting around our buildings and campuses

Make the most of your study by planning ahead: check out the environment and resources, and ask for any help you need as soon as possible.

If you have a support or guide dog (trained and supplied by a registered disability provider), they are welcome on campus.

Some lifts have raised numerals or braille, and others also have voice announcements. 

Types of support for visually impaired students

We can offer:

  • Advice and support for personal campus orientation with your RNZFB Orientation and Mobility Instructor. Contact them early to arrange your assessment and training
  • Advice on personalising assistive technology and hardware to meet your needs
  • One-to-one training on available technology
  • Access to study materials in alternative formats
  • Access to the Adaptive Technology room in the library at the City Campus
  • Support to discuss your individual needs with lecturers and academic departments
  • Alternative arrangements for assessments and exams, eg extra time, readers, the use of technology
  • Individual support for reading, scanning and library work
  • Help and strategies for accessing lecture content and notes, eg notes online.
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Physically impaired students

We’re committed to providing physical access to all teaching areas on AUT's City, North and South Campuses. As soon as you know the location of your classes, contact us for more detailed information and maps.

Support and guide dogs, trained and supplied by a registered disability provider, are welcome on campus.

Parking

If you want to park your car on campus, there are spaces for mobility cardholders. Display your mobility card at all times and give your car registration details to the main reception on your first day.

Wheelchair access

You can access all lecture theatres, classrooms and buildings, and most toilets at AUT by wheelchair. 

Most buildings have a ramp or lift, and an accessible toilet close by. Some apartments and rooms in AUT student accommodation are also accessible. Many doors have automatic openers. 

AUT campus maps
Download the Auckland CBD access map (Be Accessible website)

Types of support for physically impaired students

We can offer:

  • Campus orientation advice
  • Help to resolve classroom and building accessibility issues 
  • Support to discuss your individual needs with lecturers and academic departments
  • Alternative arrangements for assessments and examinations, eg extra time, readers/writers, use of computers
  • The use of technology to support independence
  • Help and strategies for accessing lecture content and notes, eg notes online.
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Students with specific learning disabilities

‘Specific learning disabilities’ is a general term to describe challenges with listening, speaking, reading, writing, remembering, reasoning, or mathematics – like dyslexia, dyscalculia or an autistic spectrum disorder, for example. This could be a long term issue, or the result of an illness, medical condition or injury.

Getting support from us

If you have been diagnosed with a specific learning disability, we need to see the report (usually from an educational psychologist) before we can agree to any additional help.

If you don’t have an assessment report, but know or suspect you are having difficulties, you can arrange a meeting and learning assessment.

A learning assessment aims to find out what your strengths are and where you may need help. You’ll get support to develop plans which will help with your studies. Sometimes other help is possible.

Learning disabilities: make an appointment or get more information

Types of support for students with specific learning disabilities

We can offer:

  • Information on disability related issues
  • Support to discuss your needs with programme leaders and lecturers
  • Advice about specialised equipment and computer software for independent learning
  • Help and strategies for accessing lecture content and notes, eg notes online
  • Help to manage unavoidable absences from class
  • Help to study papers on a part-time basis
  • Alternative arrangements for assessments and exams, eg separate rooms and reader/writers.
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Other impairments

We recognise that students with depression and other mental health issues, medical conditions, chronic illnesses or other impairments may need extra help and resources while studying.

Contact us so we can arrange a needs assessment interview. This will help us determine what you need to maximise your capabilities and independence, and make sure you can participate as much as possible.

Types of support for students with other impairments

We can offer:

  • Campus orientation advice
  • Help to resolve classroom and building accessibility issues
  • Support to discuss your needs with lecturers and academic departments
  • Alternative arrangements for assessments and exams, eg extra time, readers/writers, use of computers
  • Technology to support independence
  • Help and strategies for accessing lecture content and notes, eg notes online
  • Help to manage unavoidable absences from class
  • Help to study papers on a part-time basis
  • AUT's Student Advisor - Mental Health (not a diagnostic service, but will discuss with you and your mental health practitioner to confirm diagnosis and needs).
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Temporary injuries and ACC

If you have an accident resulting in an injury that affects your studies, you should contact your lecturers immediately. Your lecturers will tell you how they can help you. If you're going to be absent from classes for a long time, you must also contact the programme leader.

You must report your accident to ACC if you're going to need extra help to continue with your studies.

Help from your lecturers

Your lecturers may be able to:

  • Help you find a student to borrow or copy notes from
  • Give you notes
  • Agree to tape/digitally record classes - equipment could be borrowed from us, if available
  • Agree to approve extensions or extra time for essays or exams.
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Last updated: 14-Jul-2016 3.19pm

The information on this page was correct at time of publication. For a comprehensive overview of AUT qualifications, please refer to the Academic Calendar.