Past lectures

Biodiversity: Where, why and how do we save it
Tuesday 10 October 2017
at 4.30pm in the WA Conference Centre
Professor Len Gillman
Professor of Biogeography
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Accountability for Sustainability: Private Interest vs Social Responsibility
Tuesday 26 September 2017
at 4.30pm in the WA Conference Centre
Professor Chris Van Staden
Professor of Accounting
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Migrant health: when culture matters
Tuesday 29 August 2017
at 4.30pm in the WA Conference Centre
Professor Eleanor Holroyd
Professor of Nursing
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Cool People, Wild Spaces
Tuesday 18 July 2017
at 4.30pm in the WA Conference Centre
Professor Thomas Mical
Professor of Architectural Theory
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Tuesday 20 June 2017 at 4.30pm in the WA Conference Centre
Professor Jarrod Haar
Professor of Management
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Of Other Thoughts and Pacific Spaces
Tuesday 30 May 2017 at 4.30pm in the WA Conference Centre
Professor Tina Engels-Schwarzpaul
Professor of Spatial Design and Postgraduate Studies
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Reducing the use of force in mental health services: 'When the rubber hits the road'
Tuesday 9 May 2017 at 4.30pm in the WA Conference Centre
Professor Brian McKenna
Professor of Forensic Mental Health
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Politicians, Journalists and Power Games
Tuesday 11 April 2017 at 4.30pm in the WA Conference Centre
Professor Geoffrey Craig
Professor of Communication Studies
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Tuesday 14 March 2017 at 4.30pm in the WA Conference Centre
Professor Warren Brookbanks
Professor of Law
Lecture title: “Medical manslaughter: criminalisation or manslaughter”
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Tuesday 18 October – Professor Rhema Vaithianathan

Professor of Economics
Social Policy in a Time of Big Data: Egalitarian utopia or Orwellian nightmare?
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Tuesday 27 September – Professor Chris Braddock
Professor of Visual Arts
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Tuesday 13 September – Professor Marjolein Lips-Wiersma
Professor of Ethics and Sustainability Leadership
Meaningful work: ‘nice’ or ‘necessary’?
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Tuesday 23 August – Professor Keith Tudor
Professor of Psychotherapy
The Argumentative Therapist
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Tuesday 19 July – Professor Kate Diesfeld

Professor of Law
“If we had a hammer…” Building better legal systems with disabled people
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Mind the gap

By: Professor of Mechanical Engineering Enrico Haemmerle
Held: Tuesday 28 June

Enrico Haemmerle

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Mauri Oho Mauri Ora: A hikoi of transformation, hope and healing for Māori whanau

By: Professor Denise Wilson
Held: Tuesday 31 May

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The contestable nature of legal education

By: Professor Charles Rickett
Held: Tuesday 3 May

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A fairly random journey through the history of science - with a personal perspective

By:Professor Reinhard Klette
Held: Tuesday 12 April

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What Happened to the Law?

By: Professor Allan Beever
Professor of Law
Held: Tuesday 8 March

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From Bean Counting to Corporate Communications

By: Professor Asheq Rahman
Professor of Financial Accounting, Head of Department of Accounting, Faculty of Business and Law
Held: Tuesday 20 October

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The Queen of Science and Her Slaves

By: Professor Jiling Cao
Professor of Mathematics, Faculty of Design and Creative Technologies
Held: Thursday 8 October

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Human Rights and Human Wrongs in New Zealand

By: Professor Judy McGregor
Professor of Social Sciences and Public Policy, Faculty of Culture and Society
Held: Tuesday 25 August
 
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Auckland Housing - the all new South Sea Islands bubble?

By: Professor John Tookey
Professor of Engineering, Faculty of Design and Creative Technologies
Held: Monday 10 August 2015

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Goal Setting In Rehabilitation: Does It Work?

By: Richard Siegert
Professor of Psychology and Rehabilitation
Held: Wednesday 22 July 2015

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Teaching With My Hammer

By: Professor Liz Smythe
Professor of Healthcare Practice, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences
Held: 26 May 2015

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20,000 Adventures Under The Sea

By: Professor Andrea Alfaro
Professor of Applied Science, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences
Held: Friday 15 May 2015

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Chemistry Matters

By: Professor Allan Blackman
Professor of Chemistry, Faculty of Health and Environmental Sciences
Held: Thursday 2 April 2015


Professor Allan BlackmanChemistry is a vital part of every aspect of our daily lives, and yet it is not given a second thought by the majority of the populace. This talk aims to redress the balance somewhat by showing the fundamental importance of chemistry to life on earth.

Most importantly, it will be illustrated with everyday examples which will hopefully dispel the oft-quoted myth that ‘chemicals are bad’. Chemistry is the reason we live as we do, and it will be chemists who will make the discoveries that will ensure the continuance of life on earth as we know it. The more that everyone on the planet knows about chemistry, the better will be our chances of survival.

Professor Blackman was born and educated in Dunedin. On completion of his PhD with Professor David Buckingham and Dr Charles Clark, he spent a postdoctoral period at Indiana University, before returning to the University of Otago to take up a lecturing position. He spent sabbatical time at the University of Minnesota, the University of Queensland and Université Joseph Fourier in Grenoble, and was also appointed as an Adjunct Professor at the National University for Defense Technology in Changsha, China.

In 2014, Professor Blackman moved to AUT. His interests centre around coordination chemistry, science communication and chemistry education.
More information

- See more at: http://www.aut.ac.nz/research/professorial-addresses#sthash.OvaBz8ZJ.dpuf

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Chemistry is a vital part of every aspect of our daily lives, and yet it is not given a second thought by the majority of the populace. This talk aims to redress the balance somewhat by showing the fundamental importance of chemistry to life on earth.

Most importantly, it will be illustrated with everyday examples which will hopefully dispel the oft-quoted myth that ‘chemicals are bad’. Chemistry is the reason we live as we do, and it will be chemists who will make the discoveries that will ensure the continuance of life on earth as we know it. The more that everyone on the planet knows about chemistry, the better will be our chances of survival. - See more at: http://www.aut.ac.nz/research/professorial-addresses#sthash.OvaBz8ZJ.dpuf
Chemistry is a vital part of every aspect of our daily lives, and yet it is not given a second thought by the majority of the populace. This talk aims to redress the balance somewhat by showing the fundamental importance of chemistry to life on earth.

Most importantly, it will be illustrated with everyday examples which will hopefully dispel the oft-quoted myth that ‘chemicals are bad’. Chemistry is the reason we live as we do, and it will be chemists who will make the discoveries that will ensure the continuance of life on earth as we know it. The more that everyone on the planet knows about chemistry, the better will be our chances of survival.

Professor Blackman was born and educated in Dunedin. On completion of his PhD with Professor David Buckingham and Dr Charles Clark, he spent a postdoctoral period at Indiana University, before returning to the University of Otago to take up a lecturing position. He spent sabbatical time at the University of Minnesota, the University of Queensland and Université Joseph Fourier in Grenoble, and was also appointed as an Adjunct Professor at the National University for Defense Technology in Changsha, China.

In 2014, Professor Blackman moved to AUT. His interests centre around coordination chemistry, science communication and chemistry education.
More information - See more at: http://www.aut.ac.nz/research/professorial-addresses#sthash.OvaBz8ZJ.dpuf
Chemistry is a vital part of every aspect of our daily lives, and yet it is not given a second thought by the majority of the populace. This talk aims to redress the balance somewhat by showing the fundamental importance of chemistry to life on earth.

Most importantly, it will be illustrated with everyday examples which will hopefully dispel the oft-quoted myth that ‘chemicals are bad’. Chemistry is the reason we live as we do, and it will be chemists who will make the discoveries that will ensure the continuance of life on earth as we know it. The more that everyone on the planet knows about chemistry, the better will be our chances of survival.

Professor Blackman was born and educated in Dunedin. On completion of his PhD with Professor David Buckingham and Dr Charles Clark, he spent a postdoctoral period at Indiana University, before returning to the University of Otago to take up a lecturing position. He spent sabbatical time at the University of Minnesota, the University of Queensland and Université Joseph Fourier in Grenoble, and was also appointed as an Adjunct Professor at the National University for Defense Technology in Changsha, China.

In 2014, Professor Blackman moved to AUT. His interests centre around coordination chemistry, science communication and chemistry education.
More information - See more at: http://www.aut.ac.nz/research/professorial-addresses#sthash.OvaBz8ZJ.dpuf

Professor Allan BlackmanChemistry is a vital part of every aspect of our daily lives, and yet it is not given a second thought by the majority of the populace. This talk aims to redress the balance somewhat by showing the fundamental importance of chemistry to life on earth.

Most importantly, it will be illustrated with everyday examples which will hopefully dispel the oft-quoted myth that ‘chemicals are bad’. Chemistry is the reason we live as we do, and it will be chemists who will make the discoveries that will ensure the continuance of life on earth as we know it. The more that everyone on the planet knows about chemistry, the better will be our chances of survival.

Professor Blackman was born and educated in Dunedin. On completion of his PhD with Professor David Buckingham and Dr Charles Clark, he spent a postdoctoral period at Indiana University, before returning to the University of Otago to take up a lecturing position. He spent sabbatical time at the University of Minnesota, the University of Queensland and Université Joseph Fourier in Grenoble, and was also appointed as an Adjunct Professor at the National University for Defense Technology in Changsha, China.

In 2014, Professor Blackman moved to AUT. His interests centre around coordination chemistry, science communication and chemistry education.
More information

- See more at: http://www.aut.ac.nz/research/professorial-addresses#sthash.OvaBz8ZJ.dpuf

Professor Allan BlackmanChemistry is a vital part of every aspect of our daily lives, and yet it is not given a second thought by the majority of the populace. This talk aims to redress the balance somewhat by showing the fundamental importance of chemistry to life on earth.

Most importantly, it will be illustrated with everyday examples which will hopefully dispel the oft-quoted myth that ‘chemicals are bad’. Chemistry is the reason we live as we do, and it will be chemists who will make the discoveries that will ensure the continuance of life on earth as we know it. The more that everyone on the planet knows about chemistry, the better will be our chances of survival.

Professor Blackman was born and educated in Dunedin. On completion of his PhD with Professor David Buckingham and Dr Charles Clark, he spent a postdoctoral period at Indiana University, before returning to the University of Otago to take up a lecturing position. He spent sabbatical time at the University of Minnesota, the University of Queensland and Université Joseph Fourier in Grenoble, and was also appointed as an Adjunct Professor at the National University for Defense Technology in Changsha, China.

In 2014, Professor Blackman moved to AUT. His interests centre around coordination chemistry, science communication and chemistry education.
More information

- See more at: http://www.aut.ac.nz/research/professorial-addresses#sthash.OvaBz8ZJ.dpuf

Professor Allan BlackmanChemistry is a vital part of every aspect of our daily lives, and yet it is not given a second thought by the majority of the populace. This talk aims to redress the balance somewhat by showing the fundamental importance of chemistry to life on earth.

Most importantly, it will be illustrated with everyday examples which will hopefully dispel the oft-quoted myth that ‘chemicals are bad’. Chemistry is the reason we live as we do, and it will be chemists who will make the discoveries that will ensure the continuance of life on earth as we know it. The more that everyone on the planet knows about chemistry, the better will be our chances of survival.

Professor Blackman was born and educated in Dunedin. On completion of his PhD with Professor David Buckingham and Dr Charles Clark, he spent a postdoctoral period at Indiana University, before returning to the University of Otago to take up a lecturing position. He spent sabbatical time at the University of Minnesota, the University of Queensland and Université Joseph Fourier in Grenoble, and was also appointed as an Adjunct Professor at the National University for Defense Technology in Changsha, China.

In 2014, Professor Blackman moved to AUT. His interests centre around coordination chemistry, science communication and chemistry education.
More information

- See more at: http://www.aut.ac.nz/research/professorial-addresses#sthash.OvaBz8ZJ.dpuf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last updated: 16-Oct-2017 12.59pm

The information on this page was correct at time of publication. For a comprehensive overview of AUT qualifications, please refer to the Academic Calendar.